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Metformin Use May Increase Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in Diabetic Women: An Analysis of the Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Health Screening Cohort Database

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(@j)
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https://kjfm.or.kr/upload/pdf/kjfm-22-0005.pdf

The researchers expected to find confirmation of an anticancer effect but discovered that their findings are inconsistent with their hypothesis that metformin can reduce pancreatic cancer and concluded "men without DM had a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than male metformin non-users with DM, whereas female metformin
users with DM were at a higher risk of pancreatic cancer than female metformin non-users with DM."

https://kjfm.or.kr/upload/pdf/kjfm-22-0005.pdf

 


   
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(@daniel)
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Dear Johan, 

Thank you for your contribution.

I would like to add the following to this, in order to make it clear for the readers of this website:

1. This study speaks about a potential impact of metformin prior to having cancer - as we very well known from an overwhelming amount of literature, once someone has cancer Metformin is an outstanding drug to help slow down cancer (for reasons well understood)

Many drugs that are best avoided by people without cancer, are important tools for someone with cancer, that in some cases have been demonstrated to add many years of life. Here is an example of a case report (not panc cancer but relevant - a highly aggressive one that can kill faster than panc cancer) from a respectable doctor (Dr. Robert Nagourney) https://www.nagourneycancerinstitute.com/post/for-a-26-year-old-stage-4-adrenal-cancer-it-s-knowing-where-and-how-to-look  

2. Based on my direct experience with Meformin used by pancreatic cancer patients, Meformin added value and extended their life

In my view, Meformin is a repurposed drug that should be part of a treatment strategy for each panc cancer patient and when implemented correctly in relation to chemo, it has the potential to improve its effectiveness.

Kind regards,
Daniel


   
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(@j)
Joined: 6 years ago
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Have you seen this study @daniel? I have posted it in the TNBC thread a few days ago.

Apigenin + metformin  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-93270-0/figures/7

Seems like a promising combination, I personally don't like metformin in cancer treatment but as you point out in the right setting and combination it could be a valuable option in cancer treatment. Apigenin with metformin seems like a good combination based on the result of this in vivo study. 


   
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(@daniel)
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@j Hi Johan,

Thank you for pointing out the study. I haven't seen that yet. Indeed, it looks very good. The nice point is that the dose of Apigenin used in the study can be achieved via oral administration.

It woudl be indeed interesting to try that, and I will keep an eye on if people reporting positive results have by chance this combo part of their treatment protocol.

I actually did hear of positive cases during the past weeks that may include such combo.

Kind regards,
Daniel


   
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(@j)
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@daniel exactly I did a conversion and it would be approx 760.14 mg METFORMIN and
243.24 mg APIGENIN.


   
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(@j)
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Looking at the size of the tumors in the mice it's the addition of the apigenin and the higher dose that made the difference, so in case of a dosage adjustment, I'd opt to increase apigenin. 


   
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