Nuclear Pore Comple...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) --- Selectively Killed Cancer Cells

4 Posts
2 Users
10 Likes
514 Views
Kimster
(@kimster)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 115
Topic starter  

Hi friends, just came across the following, so just adding here:

 

https://www.technologynetworks.com/cancer-research/news/killing-cancer-cells-by-blocking-access-to-the-nucleus-340938

Killing Cancer Cells by Blocking Access to the Nucleus

NEWS: Sep 29, 2020

Melanoma cells create more nuclear pores (green) than normal cells.

The scientists showed that blocking the formation of nuclear pores selectively killed cancer cells, revealing a new Achilles heel for cancer that may lead to better treatments for aggressive tumors such as melanoma, leukemia and colorectal cancer.

Credit: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

 

https://cancerdiscovery.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2020/09/18/2159-8290.CD-20-0581

Inhibition of Nuclear Pore Complex Formation Selectively Induces Cancer Cell Death

Accepted: September 15, 2020

 

Thanks.

Kimster

This topic was modified 2 years ago 2 times by Kimster

   
Daniel and Daniel reacted
Quote
Kimster
(@kimster)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 115
Topic starter  

Same information from:

 

https://www.genengnews.com/news/researchers-keep-cancer-cells-out-by-blocking-the-gate-to-the-nucleus/

Researchers Keep Cancer Cells Out by Blocking the Gate to the Nucleus

September 29, 2020

 

The nucleus of a cell is centrally important to an organism.

It stores and organizes genetic information, while separating and protecting this very important information from the host of other cellular components.

While the nucleus requires this protective isolation, it also needs to communicate with the rest of the cell, exchanging proteins and RNA.

The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is responsible for the protected exchange of components between the nucleus and cytoplasm and for preventing the transport of material not destined to cross the nuclear envelope.

Now researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that blocking this channel shrank aggressive tumors in mice while leaving healthy cells unharmed.

 

Thanks.

Kimster


   
Daniel and Daniel reacted
ReplyQuote
Jcancom
(@jcancom)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 624
 

kimster, one concept that people almost immediately encounter when confronting cancer is the idea that cancer cells are so difficult to target because they are so alike normal cells. After all of these years I do not believe this idea anymore. What is continuing to amaze me is how many differences there are between normal cells and cancer. It is startling. There are many many differences.

A genetic sequencing of a tumor cell probably would uncover ~thousands of differences. It is very difficult to imagine that such a a scan would not discover an actionable course of treatment. This is a tactic that those on forum should definitely pursue.   

Even in the last few posts we have seen yet more. Lat1, the surface proteins from my aldehyde thread,.. many many more.

Your latest post offers yet another potential target. I must admit I am somewhat stumped (I think it is good to be honest about this as all too often it is so easy to say that the next step in research was so obvious after the fact and not before) as to how this might be applied clinically, though I am sure when they get to work on it that treatments will emerge. 

Given the above my current impression is that cancer is now a highly treatable illness. Here again I might not be able to precise about the whys and wherefores, though at an impressionistic level the basic research needed for effective cancer treatment does appear to have been done.


   
Kimster and Kimster reacted
ReplyQuote
Kimster
(@kimster)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 115
Topic starter  

Dear Jcancom,

Hi, thank you very much for your message & information.

Thanks a lot for your efforts to continue to post to share information in this Forum, so that visitors (like me) of this website could continue to learn 🙂

I LIKEd some of your posts though I do not leave any comment as I could not understand some details.

I'm not from the Oncology field, but I have learnt a lot from this website --- thanks to Daniel's great efforts to create & maintain this website to share & offer help and contributions from friends like you & Johan 🙂

I'm not able to offer direct help to others in this website as I'm still learning, but what I could do is to continue to share what I read that has not been shared in this website.

 

Thanks.

Kimster


   
johan, Daniel, johan and 1 people reacted
ReplyQuote
Share: