Is cancer an infect...
 
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Is cancer an infectious disease?


Daniel
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Every day I find more an more signs suggesting the answer is Yes, due to the following reasons:
 
- most of the mechanism I research in oncology end up being mechanism highly relevant for viruses and parasites
- most of the anticancer drugs (and re-purposed drugs) and herbs are also anti viral and anti parasitic
- more importantly, many cancer patient I am in contact with soon after they get cancer, someone close to them (child, parent, wife, husband) gets cancer too - this happens so often that is not a coincidence anymore
 
Here is a paper I came across today and I like, discussing the possible relation between viruses and cancer and suggesting that antiviral therapies should become part of the anti cancer treatment strategies:
 
Accelerated cancer aggressiveness by viral oncomodulation: New targets and newer natural treatments for cancer control and treatment http://surgicalneurologyint.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/9697/SNI-10-199.pdf

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johan
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Very interesting, D! Apparently Warburg looked at the possibility of cancer being a fungus, and he concluded it isn't but it acts like a fungus. Many of those same antiviral drugs and natural compounds are also antifungal. Here's a recent study linking fungi to the spread of pancreatic cancer:

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02892-y

Many of the antiviral compounds are good anti-fungal, or vice-versa.


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johan
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If you look at warts for example, a virus infect skin(cells) and causes rapid growth and it often spreads to other areas. Sounds familiar right. I'm not a health practitioner but this month a friend was complaining of a wart on his hand, it was growing bigger. Without really giving it much thought I put some vitD3 drops on it (in olive oil) and told him to try it for a few days in a row. The wart's gone, in a week. 


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Daniel
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@johan

Hi Johan, you are right, I should be more specific: Bacteria, Viruses, Fungi, and Parasites. It happened to me something similar Johan: some years ago, I had warts on my foot. First I had one that was growing. I tried to destroy it with some chemical solution that I used successfully when I was a child and now my one wart became many .... that was so annoying and I could not find a good solution against that (at that time I had no medical research experience). Once my wife was diagnosed with cancer, I started a very strict diet with no carbohydrates, etc. I lost like 15kg in a few months and with that I also lost the warts. After one-two months of diet (and 3x/week exercise), the warts started to turn into black sports, and one month latter they were all gone. They were never back. Your idea wit Vit D3 is also very interesting. The diet and the warts story showed to me the power of diet and of our immune systems when allowed to do its job.


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Daniel
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@johan

Btw, this is a nice article, somewhat related to our discussion: More than half your body is not human https://www.bbc.com/news/health-43674270#


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johan
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it's amazing isn't it, there's so much to discover yet. With the knowledge that we are more microbes than actual human cells, I think the use of antibiotics should be carefully considered for each treatment. The article says "Antibiotics and vaccines have been the weapons unleashed against the likes of smallpox, Mycobacterium tuberculosis or MRSA. That's been a good thing and has saved large numbers of lives." No doubt antibiotics have saved many lives, but so has the increase in hygiene, cleaner food, housing etc I think it's possible antibiotics have gotten a bit too much credit. 

 


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johan
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Found this today on the ScienceDaily widget: High fiber, yogurt diet associated with lower lung cancer risk

"the health benefits may be rooted in their prebiotic (nondigestible food that promotes growth of beneficial microorganisms in the intestines) and probiotic properties. The properties may independently or synergistically modulate gut microbiota in a beneficial way."

 


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Daniel
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@johan

Yes, Johan, its clear antibiotics have a huge impact. In general it is good to stay away from them if possible, but when the disease is active and cannot be treated in another way, antibiotics could be the winning ticket. Some months ago I started writing a post on antibiotics but it still needs to be finished. There are many positive case report on cancer patients using antibiotics. The most outstanding case I came across is a pancreatic cancer patient, a female, who is now cancer free, more than 7 years after she was getting ready to die due to the advanced stage. But she was lucky to find another oncologist who proposed an intensive schedule of antibiotics during 30 days (2x/day intravenous). This also reminds me that the most effective drug for my wife was Salinomycin, which is an antibiotic. This is why, while I do not like them, antibiotics are relevant tools in fighting cancer. 


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johan
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Amazing, Daniel. Looking forward to the report on antibiotics in cancer treatment!


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johan
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I've been thinking about this Daniel. I think stress/depression/sadness could also explain why you're seeing relatives "catching" cancer. And why many people get cancer in the first place. 


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Daniel
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@johan

Hi Johan, I am happy you are thinking about this as it is very important. I always very much appreciate reading your thoughts.

I agree that stress plays a major role in occurrence and development of cancer. At this point I see stress as a contributor to creating the suitable environment for the "seed" to stick and grow. Stress, next to diet, and lifestyle in general, and in some cases next to possible genetic weaknesses, makes us susceptible to various elements that trigger cancer when the conditions are matched.

Why I think is not just stress, is because not all the people that are in a high and continuous stress condition develop cancer, and also not all those that I know and developed cancer after a relative had it, were in high and continuous stress condition. Next to this, if we zoom out, there are more arrows indicating that there is a parasite/virus/fungus/bacteria-like trigger, such as the mechanism in cancer cells as well as the anti-cancer drugs showing also anti viral, anti parasitic, etc. action.

Nevertheless, like you said, we can also chose to look in another way and say: The parasites, fungus, bacteria, viruses, that can cause cancer are always around us. But only in special conditions, such as stressful situations, no sleep, unsuitable diet and unsuitable lifestyle in general, they can "touch the ground". 

So in the end both view are right, it's just the angle we chose, but cancer seems to be a disease that is triggered in special conditions defined by internal and external factors such as those mentioned above (and maybe others we are not aware of).

Why I think it's important to realise that parasitic elements are part of the initiation phase and cancer evolution, is because if those are addressed well, cancer can be cured. 

That is how I think/feel now dear Johan.

Kind regards,
Daniel


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johan
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Daniel
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@johan

Very good to be aware of the connection between viral infections and the (lower) humidity of the environment. Also nice to see again the website of Margaret. I came across this website long time ago, maybe >5 years, and found it very nice.


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johan
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40-50% humidity seems a good range, above 60% fungi thrive. Also, a true HEPA filter is very useful in keeping clean air in a room.

 


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johan
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Novel evidence indicates the presence and replication of hepatitis B virus in breast cancer tissue:

https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/or.2019.7393


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Daniel
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@johan

Very interesting! Thank you!


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johan
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reading your new post now...WOW! Great stuff D!


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Daniel
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@johan

Thanks a lot for feedback dear Johan!


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aurora0010
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My mother died of blood cancer when I was 11 years old and I remember we weren't allowed to use the same utensils as her just to be safe


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martin1ca
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Daniel,

Interesting.  Are you familiar with the work of Prof. Thomas Seyfried of Boston College?  Seyfried has identified cancer is a mitochondrial metabolic disease.  He discusses this here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06e-PwhmSq8

Basically Seyfried says that cancer starts with damage to the mitochondria and not the nucleus.  This damage can occur in numerous ways including viruses, fungus, parasites and infections, as you indicate.  However, is cancer contagious?  I'm not so sure but it may seem that way.  I found out recently that I have prostate cancer and because of this, my brother got checked and he has it too.  But we live on opposite coasts and haven't seen each other in 7 years until recently. Thus I don't think one of us spread the cancer to the other.  However, we were raised together and developed similar habits.

Damage to the mitochondria can also occur by eating the wrong foods, by smoking, drinking, exposure to radiation and all the other known carcinogens, obesity and of course, age.  Basically anything we do that weakens our immune system and metabolism can lead to cancer, according to Seyfried.  Seyfried argues that the entire medical profession and their standards of care are wrong in treating cancer as a nuclear disease and that mutations are simply a downstream effect of the disease.  Once the mitochondria gets damaged it can no longer use oxidative phosphorylation as its normal respiration as healthy cells do.  Instead cancer cells must use fermentable fuels such as glucose and glutamine.  He discusses how to deprive the body of both and thus how to kill most, if not all, cancer.  


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Daniel
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Thank you for pointing out that @martin1ca 

I am sorry to know both you and your brother are dealing with this.

Indeed, cancer can be triggered in multiple ways, and we have to keep our mind open to accept even possibilities that we never imagined as long as a good amount of facts come together to support that.

In this case, it could have the origin related to the lifestyle and/or in a combination with a genetic weakness and/or in combination with an e.g. viral infection that you both carry for many years (from e.g. parents).

I became aware about the work of Prof. Thomas Seyfried sometime during 2014 when I was exposed to the metabolic perspective. I totally agree that he has some very good points, but there is also a good amount of literature and facts that challenge this view. Following his view, Prof. Thomas Seyfried suggests restricted ketogenic diet (KD) as a solution to cancer. Nevertheless, in reality sometimes that works, and often it doesn't (I was in contact with many people following the restricted KD during the past years). So there is clearly value in his view, that seems to stand out in the case of brain tumors, but often there is a need for more in order for the patient to get good results.

I would specifically avoid KD in case of hormonal cancers, such as prostate cancer, as the fats from KD will turn to cholesterol that will represent fuel for hormone production.

Kind regards,
Daniel

 


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martin1ca
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Posted by: @daniel

Thank you for pointing out that @martin1ca 

I am sorry to know both you and your brother are dealing with this.

Indeed, cancer can be triggered in multiple ways, and we have to keep our mind open to accept even possibilities that we never imagined as long as a good amount of facts come together to support that.

In this case, it could have the origin related to the lifestyle and/or in a combination with a genetic weakness and/or in combination with an e.g. viral infection that you both carry for many years (from e.g. parents).

I became aware about the work of Prof. Thomas Seyfried sometime during 2014 when I was exposed to the metabolic perspective. I totally agree that he has some very good points, but there is also a good amount of literature and facts that challenge this view. Following his view, Prof. Thomas Seyfried suggests restricted ketogenic diet (KD) as a solution to cancer. Nevertheless, in reality sometimes that works, and often it doesn't (I was in contact with many people following the restricted KD during the past years). So there is clearly value in his view, that seems to stand out in the case of brain tumors, but often there is a need for more in order for the patient to get good results.

I would specifically avoid KD in case of hormonal cancers, such as prostate cancer, as the fats from KD will turn to cholesterol that will represent fuel for hormone production.

Kind regards,
Daniel

 

Hi Daniel,

Thank you so much for your response.  I hadn't considered the effects of a KD on my prostate.  I'm dealing with two major issues, 1) the cancer and 2) a fatty liver with insulin resistance.  I guess this is why Seyfield's theory rings true with me.  I adopted a KD thinking it would help with both issues I'm facing.  I lost 50 lbs and my glucose levels are now normal since I started keto.  My AST and ALT readings which were very high are also now normal.  I guess I will have to try an extended water fast to knock out the cancer then maybe just go low carb.

Yes, Seyfried definitely focuses mostly on brain cancers.  But he was good enough to email me a bunch of his published papers and other literature which I am now trying to put together into a protocol for me.  Obviously he cannot give medical advise so I'm left with trying to sort out the best strategy.  I have all of the stuff I brought back from Mexico and have added a few things since.  My labs are almost all normal now, except my PSA which is around 8-10.  But I think I am ready to gear up for a 7-10 day fast with high doses of vitamin C.  My brother completed a 4-day fast and achieved a 0.9 GK index with his glucose down to 78.  He gets a CT scan Monday.

You present a really interesting possibility when you mention that perhaps my brother and I were exposed to something as kids.  We were raised on a chicken farm which was the nastiest, dirtiest job imaginable as kids.  We were always picking up dead chickens and throwing them into pits full of maggots often without wearing any gloves.  The dust we breathed in was brutal also.  To this day I am still coughing up crap, way more than most people.  I feel like I'm always battling something in my lungs or throat.  Until recently, I used to be a distance cyclist.  I wonder if that could have caused issues with my prostate.  Regardless, I plan to beat this thing without surgery, radiation or hormone therapy.

 


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