A Vitamin E (delta-tocotrienol) added to Avastin doubled survival in Ovarian Cancer patiens  

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veeni
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07/02/2019 11:38 pm  

A trial in Denmark has shown remarkable effect in ovarian cancer by adding Vitamin E to VEGF inhibitor Bevacizumab. 
The patients got 300mg of delta-tocotrienol three times daily in addition to their Bevacizumab treatment. The disease control rate was 70%, it is twice as high as Avastin alone without major side effects:

https://www.pharmiweb.com/pressreleases/pressrel.asp?ROW_ID=304686

In a paper from 2010, tocotrienol has shown to induce the expression of interleukin-24 mRNA (pubmed: 21121862).


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Jcancom
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08/02/2019 12:16 am  

veeni, thank you  for posting this study! Here is another one in pancreatic cancer that also showed some success.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=26844278


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Jcancom
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08/02/2019 12:43 am  

veeni, as you are aware this forum has a certain healthy obsession with all things metabolic. The below article notes that tocotrienols significantly inhibit aerobic glycolysis. Clearly, biology is highly complicated, though it is still surprising to me how universally we see this metabolic effects. The fortunate part of this observation is that we then have an immediate fall back to enhance effectiveness by doubling up glycolysis inhibition with OXPHOS inhibition. Perhaps tocotrienol and Methylglyoxal would be a good combo.

Further enhancement with a nanoformulation could create additional amplification.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=27993600

{See my post of December 15, 2018 at 3:57 AM on Jess's thread for more details}


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veeni
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08/02/2019 2:06 am  

Thank you too Jcancom for the paper links, and your thoughts.

I am not a biochemist, but if I understand it right, you think tocotrienol is cutting off the glycolysis of the tumor cell? And Methylglyoxal acts as an additional anti inflammatory component?

Methylglyoxal is very interesting. I knew it only as natural antibiotics in honey.
African Honey was recently researched also by Rasha Alhaj in breast cancer, with very promising results. Although I am not sure if Methylglyoxal was responsible for the tumor suppression in her work.

I think for more indolent cancer types, which don´t rely on glycosis, tocotrienol could be combined with other VEGF inhibitors, such as Thalidomide.


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Jcancom
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08/02/2019 3:10 am  

veeni, thank you for asking clarification about the MG as I have posted on this on the thread below:

https://www.cancertreatmentsresearch.com/a-list-of-mitochondria-inhibitors/   October 30, 2018  11:27 PM

This is a very exciting combination: i.e. specifically Nano MG and nanoformulated tocotrienol that I referred to above.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25999714

And then perhaps go metronomic MG

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=30170097

MG and tocotrienol would give you inhibition of both OXPHOS and glycolysis: This should reasonably be a very powerful combination! It simultaneously shuts down the two major energy producing methods of cancer cells. Further it does this with high specificity for cancer. MG selectively targets a specific defect in subunit 1 of OXPHOS. In the nanoMG formulation this would be even more highly targeted.

Tocotrienol was shown in the article that I noted above to be selective for glycolysis in cancer cells. The nanoformulation would be even more effective ( I believe that I saw 10 micromol mentioned in the nanoformulation which was safely achieve in humans even with unformulated tocotrienol. Combining these two is perhaps one of the best and likely safest cancer treatments that I have ever seen. 

This is the great part of D's list! We can simply find a nice safe and selective OXPHOS inhibitor (such as MG) and then combine it in various ways with glycolysis inhibitors (such as tocotrienol). The combinations from D's list are already almost endless. The idea is that each of those on the list has unique biological effects probably for each patient. One could keep on recombining until finding something that had powerful anti-cancer effects.       


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