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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 510
03/08/2020 3:12 am  

Upthread, I noted how important formulation/encapsulation is. It is such an important point that I will expand upon it again. Our friend on the compass, Howard, was coping with serious metastatic illness. Even with his considerable chemical knowledge and reach into the chemical community, he was still forced into dangerous updosing with metabolic treatment because he could see no other approach to manage the spread of his illness.

The same problem emerged with the Bracht tragedy. Updosing must have seemed the only way to help the patients with severe metastatic cancer.

The problem with such occurrences is that even though one might recognize that what one is doing is dangerous and probably ill-advised, there does not seem an overwhelmingly convincing counter-argument that would suggest what exactly one should do. With terminal stage cancer, doing nothing is not a realistic option.

What should now be appreciated is that there is a way through this logical and ethical quagmire. One can both updose and increase safety. How? With proper formulations! It is quite remarkable how small the actual dose that is needed when you specifically treat the cancer and not the entire body. Typical doses with proper formulations can be reduced ~1,000 fold (sometimes more). You are updosing the tumor and down dosing the rest of the body.

This is a large step forward in our understanding of how to manage cancer. Reflexively, people will often tend to believe that more is better and move toward the line in which safety can be compromised. We can now firmly rebut this line of thought, with a strength of conviction not present even a few years ago.

Updosing is not needed. Safety does not need to be compromised in order to achieve efficacy. It is not an either or choice. You can have both.

From our discussion about formulations, the logic is rewired. Formulate and then dose down by ~2-4 (or more) orders of magnitude. Once this is fully incorporated into our rationality, treatment can be safer and more effective.

       


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dumbcritic
(@dumbcritic)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 82
07/08/2020 11:32 pm  

@jcancom A trial testing Clostridium Novyi-NT plus Keytruda is recruiting [1] as is another (using engineered E. coli) [2]. A third company should be in the clinic early next year [3] and a fourth is currently preclinical [4,5].

 

Refs:

1 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03435952

2 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04167137

3 https://www.t3pharma.com

4 https://www.gencirq.com

5 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0498-z


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Richard
(@magna)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 4
08/08/2020 4:16 am  

Hello, I have a relative that has been taking the Syrosingopine/Metformin combo for her cancer after her first round of chemo. The cancer came back so she has recommended for second round of chemo with overall prognosis not looking good now.

As she has started the chemo, she has dropped taking the Syrosingopine/Metformin combo, mainly because previous doc didn't recommend taking anything else while on chemo and also because if she has low blood pressure she could not do the chemo. Does anyone have any recommendations on this? Do you think it is ok to continue with Syrosingopine while on chemo, or should it be left till after the chemo treatment?

Thanks


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 237
08/08/2020 7:51 am  
Posted by: @magna

a relative that has been taking the Syrosingopine/Metformin combo for her cancer after her first round of chemo. The cancer came back so she has recommended for second round of chemo with overall prognosis not looking good now.

As she has started the chemo, she has dropped taking the Syrosingopine/Metformin combo, mainly because previous doc didn't recommend taking anything else while on chemo and also because if she has low blood pressure she could not do the chemo. Does anyone have any recommendations on this? Do you think it is ok to continue with Syrosingopine while on chemo,

Could you please provide more information such as type and stage of cancer, names of the chemotherapy drugs they gave her, what other treatments they gave her. amounts of syro and metformin she took and how long she took them and all the details you can?


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Daniel
(@daniel)
Admin
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 938
09/08/2020 1:06 am  
Posted by: @magna

Hello, I have a relative that has been taking the Syrosingopine/Metformin combo for her cancer after her first round of chemo. The cancer came back so she has recommended for second round of chemo with overall prognosis not looking good now.

As she has started the chemo, she has dropped taking the Syrosingopine/Metformin combo, mainly because previous doc didn't recommend taking anything else while on chemo and also because if she has low blood pressure she could not do the chemo. Does anyone have any recommendations on this? Do you think it is ok to continue with Syrosingopine while on chemo, or should it be left till after the chemo treatment?

Thanks

Hi Richard,

Answering the questions addressed by GgE is important in order for us to be able to generate more ideas. However, if the blood pressure and possible heart rate are low its best to skip drugs such as Syrosingopine. There is a lot more that can be done to support chemo. Here I discussed some elements that can be considered to try increase the effectiveness of chemo:
- https://www.cancertreatmentsresearch.com/modulating-the-yin-and-yang-energy-of-cells-to-fight-cancer-pro-oxidant-strategy/
- https://www.cancertreatmentsresearch.com/if-chemotheraphy/

Kind regards,
Daniel


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Cshankar
(@ccjmshankar)
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 2
22/08/2020 8:56 pm  

@daniel

My son has DIPG, diagnosed in 2018. I have been following the posts by Adifer. He has tried the syromet combination and you posted that you had a conversation with him about  a month ago and he commented that the phenyl butyrate was effective. Could you share my email with him or encourage him to post an update? It sounds promising! 


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Daniel
(@daniel)
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Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 938
22/08/2020 10:13 pm  

Hi @ccjmshankar 

I discussed on the phone with Adifier some months ago. There were some positive result but it was thought the results were mainly due to Phenylbutyrate used as repurposed drug, and not SyroMet. However, while on two axes the tumor was half the size, there was some progression on the other axis that was creating major problems - please send him a msg here and he will receive an e-mail notification as long as you reply to one of his comments. If there is no response i will check sometimes next week. Thank you.

Kind regards,
Daniel


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Cshankar
(@ccjmshankar)
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 2
23/08/2020 1:22 am  

@adifer 

Hi Adifer, I have a son who was also diagnosed with DIPG in 2018. He is 20 years old now. His initial treatment was radiation followed by carboplatin and sodium valproate using Convection Enhanced Delivery. Last year he started to take ONC 201. In early 2020 he received a second round of radiation. I read this thread and was hoping for more information regarding your experience with the syromet combination and wondering if you are still getting positive results with the phenyl butyrate? I would be happy to share any information regarding my son's treatment. Daniel has my permission to share my email with you. Thanks!


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adifer
(@adifer)
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 17
23/08/2020 8:43 pm  

@ccjmshankar

I know I haven't been very active lately but there have been a lot of things going on. So first things first: we tried the following:

ONC201-slight results in the begining, but improvement stopped after 3 months roughly 

Syromet-better results than ONC, much faster, but hit a plateau pretty soon again-in 2 months

Mebendazole-a bit of improvement but it might have been wishful thinking

Phenyl butyrate-best results so far, still on it, but I've hit a bump in the road supply-wise: the company I used to take it from only delivered half of my last order(only 150g from the order of 300g) saying that they don't have it on stock anymore and they have to cook a new batch, and before that DHL express seems to have misplaced 600g.

We had a very big problem with my son since he had hydrocephalus, because the shunt installed last year was no longer functional, and it took a couple of weeks until they decided to replace it (complicated story) and so he is in a very bad shape currently in ICU for a while now. During the hydrocephalus period, his digestive system just shut down and so we had about a month, maybe even more of break from all oral drugs. We started with Phenyl again a month ago, and DCA (haven't seen any improvement from it so far but we give it more time). We can talk more over email or phone if you want.


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NA
 NA
(@j)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 531
24/08/2020 12:41 am  

@adifer

Combination of phenylbutyrate and 13-cis retinoic acid

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11245454/

This was in PC.

Ben Williams, long term GBM survivor used Accutane in his drug cocktail

Melatonin, Tamoxifen might be useful adjuvant to PhenylB.

 


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NA
 NA
(@j)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 531
24/08/2020 1:11 am  
Posted by: @adifer

@ccjmshankar

...., his digestive system just shut down and so we had about a month, maybe even more of break from all oral drugs. We started with Phenyl again a month ago, and DCA (haven't seen any improvement from it so far but we give it more time).

Bacteria from gut microbiota have potential as therapeutic (HDAC) inhibitors

https://pharmafield.co.uk/pharma_news/bacteria-from-gut-microbiota-have-potential-as-therapeutic-inhibitors/


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adifer
(@adifer)
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 17
24/08/2020 8:37 pm  

When I said that his digestive system shut down, I meant it. Since he has a gastrostomy tube placed inside we know how much time it takes for the food to exit his stomach. Right now that has greatly improved, but it is still below from before the hydrocephalus period. During the blockage time, nothing got pushed out. Hours after adding something (water, food, drugs) you would find more residue in the stomach than you put in (gastric acid was still being produced). And of curse no defecation, at all. So of course adding oral drugs was useless since in the best of cases only a small part of it got through, if any. I'll look into your suggestions for enhancements. Thanks

P.S. in about a month or so we'll see what happened to the tumor in the last period hopefully.

P.P.S. the tumor reduction, i can not say with absolute certainty why it happened (I mean which drug did the deed). Since we only had a scan every 3 months and during that period it was closer to 5 months (covid happened and noone wanted to do unnecessary scans) it is difficult to say what for sure. I just told you what we used and I based my assumptions on clinical improvements. Phenyl butyrate was the only one to add fast(a couple of days) and obvious improvements. 


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NA
 NA
(@j)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 531
24/08/2020 9:25 pm  
Posted by: @adifer

When I said that his digestive system shut down, I meant it. Since he has a gastrostomy tube placed inside we know how much time it takes for the food to exit his stomach. Right now that has greatly improved, but it is still below from before the hydrocephalus period. During the blockage time, nothing got pushed out.

I understand, it's a very tough situation, I'm very sorry. I mentioned the study above because HDAC inhibitory function might be compromised as a result. 

Best regards


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Daniel
(@daniel)
Admin
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 938
25/08/2020 3:21 am  

Dear @ccjmshankar

I tried to respond your e-mail but I received the following error 

Mail Delivery System [email protected]

This seems to be related to the spam protection of your e-mail.

Please use another e-mail address. Thank you.

Kind regards,
Daniel

 

 


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John Pizzuto
(@jpizzuto)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 214
28/10/2020 5:17 pm  

Shirley died in her sleep in the hospital on Monday, one week after celebrating our 46th anniversary.

Goodbye, darling.  I miss you so much. 


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 237
28/10/2020 5:47 pm  
Posted by: @jpizzuto

Goodbye, darling.  I miss you so much. 

Johnny, I am so sorry for her and for you...My heart goes to you. You have done more than anyone I know to make your wife well again and your joint efforts deserved a better outcome. It is a shame that life didn't reward you as you and we were hoping for.

After being so dedicated to Shirley it may be difficult for you to find meaning to your life. I hope you find it and overcome your grief soon.

Words cannot help here but you may find comfort in the facts that Shirley is no longer suffering, her spirit being now free from the cancer chains, and that you have extended her life, hope and wellbeing much longer than if she had just followed standard of care treatment.

May she rest in peace and may you find consolation and peace in your own spirit.

Please, accept a big hug from me


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John Pizzuto
(@jpizzuto)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 214
28/10/2020 6:18 pm  

Thank you so much for your understanding.  You are correct, I am lost right now.  We did a lot of car camping in the Eastern Sierra, in the early '80's.  I will spread her ashes at her favorite camp sites.

She lived 29 months after her stage 4 diagnosis.  I have seen a survival curve showing half die within one year, most of the remaining within two years.

Her oncologist said she lived longer than expected, as all she could tolerate was letrozole.  I suggested her low carb diet may have helped, and she agreed.  She had trouble with solid food, and received most of her nutrition from the high fat, low carb protein shake I made her.

 

For our anniversary, I brought home a small box of See's candy, which we both enjoyed.  She was seven years older than me, but we were really in tune with each other.  For our first anniversary, unbeknownst to the other, we separately went to See's and we each bought the other a one pound gift box with the identical choices, half chocolate nut fudge, half mint truffles.

We never had the final talk about disposition of her things.  To the end, she was certain of her restoration, and any talk of her passing was negative thinking, so we didn't go there.


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 237
28/10/2020 6:54 pm  
Posted by: @jpizzuto

I am lost right now

It would be difficult not to, given the time and intensity of your dedication to her recovery. 

You have made her life 1000% better and more worth living than it would have been if you did not do what you did. She was extremely lucky to have you as her husband and she knew it.

But now you probably need a good, long rest and to take care of your health, as this is what Shirley would want you to do.

You will have time to make plans for the disposal of her ashes. You might want to keep a small amount in a nice urn or box of her taste in a quiet place in your home. This way you can visit her and talk with her when you feel the desire or the need. Similar to when people go to the cemetery to visit their loved ones. You will be surprised how talking with her might help you see nice perspectives in your life.

I would not despair if you find yourself crying day after day for months. 46 years together with a person makes that person become a part of yourself as much as your arms or your legs. And now you are missing that big part of yourself. It is as painful as going through a major surgery to remove a big part of your body...But you have to be resilient and know that it will be alright.

In the beginning everything around you will you remind of her and will make you sad. All the things she did in your home, every place she went to, every food she liked will bring you back very painful memories and make you constantly aware of that big hole in your life. But you need to think that Shirley has not disappeared. Only her body is gone. Her spirit will stay around you and will inspire you to do things for your own good. 

After some time, when you get used to Shirley being close to you in a different, invisible form, you will enjoy the memories and good experiences you had together.

Until then, I hope you find solace and company in someone you love and trust so that your bereavement does not seem to be so long.

You may also want to talk to some trustworthy estate attorney about what you can do to comply with the rules that govern a person's passing in a way that doesn't compound your grief. There are things that can help when done early on. It seems to me as though you live in Northern California, right? If you need some names I can provide them to you.

My best to you.


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John Pizzuto
(@jpizzuto)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 214
28/10/2020 7:31 pm  

Your words ring so true.  Have you been through this yourself?

I do talk to her.  When I get in bed, I pat her pillow and say I miss you baby.  Over and over.

I'm in SoCal, near Disneyland.  We used to drive up 395 and stay in campgrounds from Lone Pine to June Lake.  Her favorite campsite was along the Owens River, near Taboose Creek.  It's very peaceful there.  It's just upstream from the intake of the California Aquaduct, where LA gets most of its water.


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NA
 NA
(@j)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 531
28/10/2020 9:03 pm  

@jpizzuto

 

I'm so sorry, John. Please accept my sincere condolences.


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 237
28/10/2020 9:46 pm  
Posted by: @jpizzuto

Your words ring so true. 

I know well what losing a loved one means, this is why I feel your pain and wish I could help you ease it.

But all I can tell you is to just think of the good things she enjoyed and don't let the bad feelings stay in your head. Many negative emotions (sadness, loneliness, anger at the doctors, guilt for what you said or did, or what you didn't say or do; you name it) will assault your mind and try to destroy your soul and your heart over the next few months.

I would do as the proverb says, "You cannot keep the black birds from flying around your head but you can keep them from nesting on it" (I am sure this is not the correct wording; am sorry but when I Google it all I find is ads for bird deterrents and bird traps. But you get the idea)

You probably cannot avoid that the negative emotions try to get inside your head. But you can prevent them from settling in it. Fill your head up with positive thoughts and good memories until they stop trying. And they will, if you persevere. You have proven to be a perseverant person, so you will win this next battle that life has thrown at you.

I wish we could all be celebrating her remission. But we can't. However, we can all celebrate her life; that she passed in her sleep without agony; and the fact that she went knowing fully well she was the wife most loved in the world. I am sure that meant everything to her. This is to your credit, Johnny.


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John Pizzuto
(@jpizzuto)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 214
29/10/2020 12:00 am  

@gge

Such loving words, thank you.

Yes, I wish I could have another try at it.  We never made it to chemo, as she was afraid of the side effects.  I can't remember, did I post a video by Dr. Valter Longo, showing a study on mice and fasting before chemo?  I saw it over two years ago, then forgot about it.  Then in July, I found it again after she stopped Piqray.

In the video, he fasted one group of mice for 48 hours, the other group was fed normally.  Both groups had cancer.  Then a 3x to 5x (very high) dose of chemo was given.  All of the fasted mice lived and were active, while most of the normally fed mice were lethargic or died.

The video was from 2011 or so, and it said a clinical trial was in process.   I tracked it down and found the doctor running it is nearby, at Hoag.  By then it was mid September, so we had lost a lot of time, but I wanted the "real deal".  I should have done it on my own back in July, when I remembered it.  Or two years ago, when I first learned of it.

We got approval from our insurance for a consultation with her, but it was very disappointing.  Going in, I knew stage 4 was excluded, but I thought we could learn something.

The consultation was done using Zoom.  The protocol is a three day fast or less than 200 calories per day.  She told us she would not do chemo on anyone who could not walk.  Shirley hasn't really walked since before her diagnosis, when she weighed 205.  I asked how about a 25% dose?  No, no chemo.  Maybe she was trying to tell me her trial is a failure?  She never mentioned any results, and I suppose she is embargoed from saying, until they are published.

I have heard the metabolism of mice is about seven times that of humans, so maybe a 14 day, zero calorie fast is what should be tried, while a patient still has some weight he can afford to lose.  I sent a text to the doc doing the trial to that effect, suggesting patients be put into a medically supervised coma for two weeks, given just electrolytes, no glucose, but she didn't reply.  I forgot it would require a hospital stay, so it may be too expensive.  Do they still have open wards, where several people could be cared for at lower cost?  I know nothing about chemo.  Is there such a thing as a kill shot for stage 4?  Our oncologist would always say "You know, there is no cure.  What do you want to do?"


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 237
29/10/2020 5:09 am  
Posted by: @jpizzuto

I wish I could have another try at it.  We never made it to chemo. I know nothing about chemo.  Is there such a thing as a kill shot for stage 4?

You seem to be doing now the critical analysis you have been doing for years. Studying what you did and what the consequences were, then comparing the alternative options available and trying to decide which ones should be tried next. Completely understandable.

But going now over the “what ifs” and reconsidering the choices that were not made, trying to figure if any of them would have been better than the ones that were made would not help Shirley or you anymore. And it can hurt you psychologically.

Unfortunately there is no way to know if there was a better course of treatments. If you had made those choices you are mentioning they might not have worked either, and you’d have been left to wonder if the choices that were actually made might have worked better instead. The bottom line is that, as her oncologist told you, your choices lead to a much better outcome than what the doctors had offered her, so there is little to gain in second guessing your actions.

The sad fact is that treating cancer is like being lab mice forced to march through a painful maze that may or may not have an exit but which has a deadly trap at almost every turn, and we cannot escape. Some people find an exit, but many others don’t. You didn’t know if there were any exits in Shirley’s labyrinth, but you tried your best. Apparently there was none.

Even the best doctors and researchers don’t yet know the way out of this. Many of them also die trying.

As a devoted caretaker you used your logic and made your best efforts; you tried to learn as much as you could; and you encouraged Shirley to do the best she could. That is all you have to think now.

It is risky undertaking such an exercise in revisionism because it doesn’t really help our loved ones and because it can sow in us many doubts and feelings of guilt that can harm our spirits, already wounded by the long battles.

This doesn’t mean you cannot continue to post your thoughts and experiences in the forum. Quite the contrary. Daniel is a great example of someone who has put his knowledge and thousands of hours of his unpaid time to helping you, me and millions of others, in spite of his pain and his grief. You know that he started these pages as a way to express his amazing devotion and love for his wife Mihaela. Likewise, you can help many people with the experience and knowledge you have accumulated. I just mean that it might be safer to keep it unrelated to your judging on Shirley’s treatments, at least for a while.


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John Pizzuto
(@jpizzuto)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 214
29/10/2020 9:19 am  

This is the video with Dr. Valter Longo and his fasted mice:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lcOj0RYzPY&feature=youtu.be

The video mentions a clinical trial being conducted by Dr. Tanya Dorf.  It took me a while to find it:

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01802346

After a month of calling different numbers at USC, I learned it is now being run by Dr. Diana Hanna.  If anyone is interested, I can provide a phone number that may get you to her scheduling secretary.

The Longo fasted mice video is an excerpt from a longer video I saw back in the beginning, on amazon prime.  Looks like it's no longer available in my viewing area:

https://www.amazon.com/Science-Fasting-Sylvie-Gilman/dp/B075848T5T

Searching my emails, I see I was on to this back in May of 2018, right after Shirley's initial consultation.

In the original video, they showed a Russian clinic out in the country, where patients with various issues were fasting for extended periods, up to 30 days, I think, supported and monitored by medical staff.

So a two week medically supported fast before chemo could be done fairly easily, to reduce side effects.

And we know fasting raises ketones.  Dr. Jeff Volek at Ohio State is investigating ketosis to make chemo work better.  A clinical trial is being run by Dr. Parker Hyde, where they are getting good results with very low ketone readings of 0.5.  Shirley's ketones were frequently close to 3.

Parker Hyde video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfZSvjzxdwg

The clinical trial number is NCT03535701.  I emailed Volek and Hyde in early August but they never replied.  

Yes, it is hard to avoid what ifs, but I think the information can help someone in the future:

1)  Two week fast before chemo, to reduce side effects.  This can be done at home, but electrolytes should be taken.  I don't have any links, but I know there are some on youtube.

2)  Fast to enter deep ketosis, to improve chemo results.

 

 

 


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 237
29/10/2020 8:25 pm  
Posted by: @jpizzuto

This is the video with Dr. Valter Longo and his fasted mice:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lcOj0RYzPY&feature=youtu.be

The video mentions a clinical trial being conducted by Dr. Tanya Dorf.  It took me a while to find it:

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01802346

This is very good information and many people will find it potentially applicable to their cases.

I know that fasting works. I have personally seen a tennis ball size hormonal breast tumor become non-detectable by MRI while on a Faslodex plus anastrozole large clinical trial where the patient followed 5 days of Prof. Valter Longo's Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD) every 2 months on her own, outside of and in addition to the trial drugs. This patient was the only one that got such impressive results in the trial.

Posted by: @jpizzuto

I know nothing about chemo.  Is there such a thing as a kill shot for stage 4? 

Oncologists say that chemo therapy is usually ineffective in hormonal breast cancer cases, although it is highly effective in triple negative ones. The reason, as I understand it, is that chemo agents damage the cells RNA thus making it hard for these cells to replicate. This reduces or stops the proliferation of those cells.

But this action selectively affects mostly rapidly multiplying cancer cells such as TNBC. Hormonal breast cancer cells are typically lower grade and don't multiply fast enough for chemo.

In addition, chemo therapy damages many organs in the body, causing serious side effects, especially in the elderly. This may include "chemo fog" which forever alters the patients' minds.

Another downside of chemo is that it damages the patient's immune system, oftentimes permanently, and if any proliferating cancer cells survive, the body has little chance of containing it as it has lost most of its defenses. This explains why cases that seem to be almost like miracle cures after chemotherapy become rapidly spreading and extremely virulent when they relapse.

The way I understand it, fasting reduces the chemo side effects and improves the chemo effectiveness, but it does not make chemo work in cancers where it would not have worked without fasting.

So, my best guess is that Shirley would have had a low chance of getting any better with chemo therapy, whether with fasting or not. And that she might have had lower quality of life and a shorter survival than she did.


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John Pizzuto
(@jpizzuto)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 214
29/10/2020 8:40 pm  

Thank you, that eases my mind greatly.

I plan on spreading her ashes at her favorite camp sites.


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 237
29/10/2020 10:22 pm  
Posted by: @jpizzuto

I plan on spreading her ashes at her favorite camp sites.

OK, just try to place them away from living plants and trees, please

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/cremation-ashes-and-plants.htm  


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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 510
31/10/2020 2:23 am  

John, you were a great caregiver and researcher for your wife. Sometimes medicine does not have all the answers and these are the times that explorers (like you) can make a new path in order that we might escape from the cancer labyrinth. I learned from your experience and hopefully this knowledge can be passed forward in the future to others traveling your journey.  Accept my deepest condolences. Jcancom

 

 


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MajorTom
(@majortom)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 10
01/11/2020 5:27 pm  

Sorry to hear of your loss John. You did the utmost but sadly, often the cancer is just too far gone. Bless her and remember she is in a better place without any pain and suffering.


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marcosbomber901
(@marcosbomber901)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 93
01/11/2020 8:35 pm  

Jhon I am very sorry for your loss, it is very hard to lose a loved one who is part of your being and with whom you have shared almost all your life

 


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