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Brain Metastases Completely Disappear in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Hydrogen Gas Inhalation: A Case Report

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Daniel
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6927257/

Lung cancer is the most common type of tumor, prone to contralateral lung, bone and brain metastasis. We report a 44-year-old woman diagnosed with lung cancer with multiple metastases in November 2015. Oral targeted drugs were initiated after the removal of brain metastases, and most lesions remained stable for 28 months. In March 2018, intracranial multiple metastases, as well as hydrocephalus accumulation in the third ventricle and lateral ventricles, and metastases in bone, adrenal gland, liver were noted. Hydrogen-gas monotherapy was started to control the tumor a month later. After 4 months, the size of multiple brain tumors was reduced significantly, and the amount of hydrocephalus in the third ventricle and lateral ventricles reduced significantly. After 1 year, all brain tumors had disappeared, and there were no significant changes in metastases in the liver and lung. These data show that, after standard treatments had failed, hydrogen-gas monotherapy elicited significant effective control of tumors (especially those in the brain), and survival time was lengthened.


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Jcancom
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D sorry I have not been active in quite a while. Yet, when I read this I felt like jumping right back in! This is truly shocking! We have seen this time and time again with cancer-- it is so often the most biologically fundamental that is the weak spot of cancer. This has happened so many times. We have side-stepped H2 on many occasions, it is remarkable. This is one of the most fundamental aspects of biology and then there it is, involved with cancer. Cancer has endless problems managing the basic aspects of cell functioning: We saw this endless times with metabolism and now you have shown us the example of H2. Best Wishes for 2021!


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Jcancom
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D, it is amazing that you continue to make forward progress. You keep looking --> you keep finding. I think that I might have also found something which might be able to amplify the efforts of the forum.

I have signed up to have my genome scanned: full human genome sequencing. It is now only about ~$300 which is a remarkable price. This could have very powerful anti-cancer implications for others on forum. If you were to sequence one normal cell and also one circulating tumor cell, then you would know what specific genetic vulnerabilities the cancer cells had.

Typically with cancer there is an entire clonal population with the same genetic vulnerabilities. Just think if you could look into a cancer cell and determine that it specifically had a vulnerability to MCT1 entry (i.e., 3-BP) or so many thousands of other potential exploitable biological features. This is very exciting! We would no longer have to make suggestions without the benefit of actually knowing the genetics. One could from time to time have another blood biopsy to keep on top of any mutations that might be occurring to evolve the cancer away from the treatment.

This genetic approach is extremely exciting and hopefully others on forum will see the potential of this approach. There can be thousands and thousands of mutations in cancer cells! If the cancer cell had any mutation in a critical pathway such as metabolism than it might be auxotrophic for some possibly expendable dietary nutrient that normal cells could easily work around. With the full genome sequence, one could have a comprehensive view of all the biological pathways!

Happy New Year Everyone!

 


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Manuone
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This is very interesting Daniel! the result is spectacular in brain metastases! do you think it could be effective against glioblastoma?


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Manuone
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@jcancom J a pleasure to read you again! how are you? Happy New Year 2021 too my friend!


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Jcancom
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Manuone, Happy New! Sorry I have not been contributing of late; I am still not feeling up to speed with my ongoing breathing problems. I am very excited, though about this idea of full genome sequencing. I hope that I will be able to demonstrate the benefits of this approach. Knowing all the genetic variants in a tumor versus normal cell could be of very great importance. The one thing I am unsure about, though, is how advanced the technology is now to extract those few cancer cells from a blood sample and then sequence them.

D's H2 finding is also exciting! I am constantly amazed at the ideas that emerge with cancer treatment potential. H2 is so fundamental a chemical that it is so natural to overlook it-- it is almost too obvious. I am interested in whether D could help us out on how to make hydrogen water or other hydrogen therapies. 

Manuone, Best Wishes for 2021! There is always so much excitement in cancer research (especially metabolic research) that I am anxious to see what the new year might bring us to help treat cancer. We have seen that adding in an extra synergistic treatment can powerfully affect cancer cells.

J


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Daniel
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@jcancom

J, so nice to hear from you! Happy New Year to you and all the people reading this!

I hope everything is well with you! 

Kind regards,
Daniel


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Daniel
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@jcancom J, I am sorry to hear you still have breathing challenges. As we have developed our research skills in medical space, we could team up to try to understand the origin and find a solution to this during the coming months. What do you think?

Btw, Manuel is doing a great job with his mom. I think she is now >5 years dealing with glioblastoma which is a very difficult to deal with using conventional options only.

There are multiple examples of people I am in contact with, who are doing well combining simple metabolic treatments with conventional options (including pancreatic cancer patient), but I have no time to report them here and keep track of those with updates (as people expect from me).

Kind regards,
Daniel


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Jcancom
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D that would be great! This is great news about the successes. Yes, I can certainly see how success would happen with the basic ideas that we have discussed for so long. We are right on top of so many of these fundamental metabolic pathways -- cycling through these combinations would almost have to hit something effective. I want to be 100% when we finally make a definitive break through.

Manuone has done such an extremely good job with helping his mother. There is such a mountain of research to work through and then try and find the best of what you find. It is a tough job, yet he has done great! People like Manoune greatly help us focus on the effective strategies. It is the best type of partnership where we can help guide the basic research and then others can take it from there. Great job Manuone!  Best Wishes for 2021 Manuone!  

It's embarrassing that I have not found a way around this respiratory problem. Cancer is fairly unique in that it fights back against treatment. With most other illnesses if you can find something that is effective it will keep on having an effect. Yet, when I went to a doctor about this, the doctor was also somewhat puzzled: there does not seem to be that many things that can be causing this: don't smoke, don't have an obvious respiratory trigger ... just seemed to pop up out of nowhere.  Another online doctor suggested that i try NAC and glutathione, possibly with DSMO. I have the pill form of the first two, though I would like to go liquid. D, do you have any idea of sourcing these in liquid form and dosing? Best Wishes for 2021 D and all our friends on forum!

     


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Manuone
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@jcancom and @Daniel

I am seriously considering introducing hydrogen therapy. Perhaps the most economical way is with a hydrogenated water machine like this one: https://www.amazon.es/dp/B08KDMLGF4/ref=sspa_dk_detail_3?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B08KDMLGF4&pd_rd_w=XHsB4&pf_brd_ab36-wbd716-pf_brd4_abd4 = 93j9t & pf_rd_r = TN55FWEE9JAJGRJWNHEC & pd_rd_r = 566ef4fa-1009-4d97-BE70-e7ea98fd7d78 & sPLA = ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUFBMDFCU0syU1FQQlQmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTA2NzcyNTFYVzhRWktRR1ZSTlEmZW5jcnlwdGVkQWRJZD1BMDY3MTI0NTIzTU8wVDNVUkJOVE0md2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9kZXRhaWwmYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl

Any suggestion?


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Jcancom
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@Manuone, it is always great to see that you are open to new anti-cancer strategies. I think that this approach to cancer management is important for success. Cancer is always on the move: treatments also needs to be responsive.

The hydrogen water machine could be a start to become more comfortable with H2 therapy, though it might be necessary to move to the hydrogen oxygen machine that is described in the patient report. The patient apparently underwent inhalation therapy with H2 (2/3) and O2 (1/3) for ~3 hours per day. This would seem to be much more intense than drinking hydrogen water. Staying with the hydrogen gas machine treatment protocol seems to be the best idea.

 

Interesting, H2 therapy is more clinically advanced than I had been aware. Here are 55 stage IV CR patients using H2 inhalation.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30542740/

 

Here 42 lung cancer patients (improved OS) (also H2 inhalation 3 hours per day). H2 might be a good one to use preventatively to avoid brain mets .

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32994821/


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Jcancom
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@Manuone

Somewhat early, though thought you might be interested

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201222101455.htm


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Jcancom
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"Hydrogen is an inert gas and its solubility in water is very low, so it is difficult to ensure that the required concentration in tissues is achieved by drinking hydrogen-rich water. It has been reported that hydrogen in the brain is undetectable after drinking hydrogen-rich water."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6779007/

Probably best to stay with H2 gas therapy.


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Jcancom
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@Manuone, this could become complicated.

"Do not believe inhaling Pure Hydrogen is flammable as told by other Inhalation machines that give you 1 part Oxygen and 2 parts Hydrogen known as Brown’s Gas. Their absurd claim of flammable risk is not applicable because our machine operates at 99.995% pure hydrogen production which is well above the combustible range of 4% to 75% level for safe and reliable operation."

Brown's Gas is what the cancer research that has been reported appears to be using. For some reason, the below url is saying that Brown's gas should be avoided. 

 

This one is expensive. "The gas generating capacity of 100/ml per minute flow rate is more than adequate for daily use ..."

 

Very interesting! This removes lactic acid? Cancer can be characterized as being centrally a disease of lactic acid. It would be very interesting if H2 could remove lactic acid from around cancer. Unclear, though, about the chemistry involved.  

"This far exceeds the recommended daily dose of 3 PPM / 3 mg. without reliance on drinking numerous bottles of hydrogen water. It’s perfect for recuperating from exercise by removing lactic acid from the muscles and reducing potential inflammation due to injury or strain and allow faster healing."

https://h2waterforlife.com/product/h2-300-inhaler-pro/

https://h2waterforlife.com/how-it-works/

 

Wow, this one is $169 and has an inhaler! Probably best to contact them if interested and see if this would give the desired flow rate and concentration.

https://h2waterforlife.com/product/h2-usb-sport-pro-ii-with-inhaler-adapter/

 

Good to take some time and think which one is right for you. The above has a forum section so that might be helpful.


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Jcancom
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This article https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7509685/

used this machine Hycellvator ET 100 in cancer treatment

"The Hycellvator ET 100 (Helix Japan, Co., Ltd.) generates 1.67 l/ min hydrogen gas (hydrogen purity, 99.99%) by electrolysis. As measured by gas chromatography at Kureha Special Laboratory, the gas generated 680,000 ppm hydrogen gas and 320,000 ppm oxygen gas."

https://www.navida.ne.jp/snavi/100114_1_1.html

Good to know what models are being used. Would then want to see how other models compare. the H2 for life unit above speaks of 100 ml per minute of H2 gas generation. The Japanese unit also generates 100 ml per minute see website (above url use google translate).

https://h2waterforlife.com/product/h2-300-inhaler-pro/   costs ~$1500. 

 

"Campaign selling price 296,000 yen! !!"  2,394.60 euro

Campaign rental price
13,200 yen / month! !!

(Regular price 19,800 yen)

13200 yen equals 105 euro (per month)

 


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Manuone
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Great job J! Thank you very much the information has helped me a lot! I am clear that the administration of hydrogen must be by inhalation in order to reproduce the therapeutic effects of the study. The challenge is the difference between brain metastasis and primary tumors of the central nervous system, but I also believe that it can have a good therapeutic impact!

Kind regards


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Jcancom
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Thank you Manuone! One thing to be aware of is the potential for considerable selection bias. They are reporting the one patient who had a good response: How many did not have a good response? What is the denominator? Will also be very interested to see how a metabolic perspective might be introduced. What metabolic combinations might help?

Best Wishes, J

 


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Manuone
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@Jcancom look at this

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6528353/

 


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Jcancom
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Manuone
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The other machines infused 100ml per minute. This last one that you published indicates 430ml in 3 minutes ... ??


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Manuone
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680,000 ppm hydrogen gas and 320,000 ppm oxygen gas.


This is what is needed, this machine would only infuse 1500-1600 ppm


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Jcancom
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Manuone, yes I think you are correct. The consumer grade models are only meant for "light" use.

I am not entirely sure whether the 680,000 ppm hydrogen gas is fully comparable with the 1500 ppm (1500 ppm is the hydrogen content of the water), though the 680,000 ppm clearly seems to be on an entirely different scale.

There is a great deal of research on this hydrogen technology; I will be very interested to see how this might combine with metabolic approaches.

 

Best Wishes, J


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Jcancom
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Whoa! I was wondering, wondering where's the metabolic angle? Bingo! Glycolysis ? OXPHOS? Do we ever talk about anything else?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7005324/


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Jcancom
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Wow! These hydrogen makers have been on the market for years now. The one I showed above is a ~ first generation generator that can produce ~1500 ppb. Yet, we are now on around the fifth generation. these machines can produce ~5500 ppb. The one below is able to produce ~3000 ppb and is now already moving down in price to an entry level model.

Need to be aware that the clinical grade unit that I quoted above able to produce 680,000 PPM. The consumer grade units currently produce up to ~5500 PPB

I bought one of the first generation machines today with an inhalation kit. Hopefully, it might help with my breathing problems.

 

 

 


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Jcancom
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I have been wondering for quite some time how fuel cells might be relevant for cancer. OXPHOS has several similarities to a fuel cell: it involves O2 and H2 and produces an electric potential. This has me wondering whether fuel cells could be reversed in order to create H2 gas. This is largely what is being done with the hydrogen generators that we referred to above. I also wonder whether nano-fuel cells with on-board oxygen might be a cancer treatment approach: bring the nano-fuel cells to the mitochondria and do the mitochondria's job.


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Jcancom
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@Daniel, D this is really startling about H2 and glycolysis and OXPHOS (see the article above about asthma). We will have to wait and see, though there might be a similar process involved with cancer. I know Johan did not like me saying it though metabolics truly is everywhere. Even I am surprised about how often it turns up. Perhaps we should assume that everything that happens is related to metabolics until proven otherwise. What is especially funny is that this H2 health discovery largely happened by chance. ~2007 fuel cells started to perk up and some amount of animal research was probably required to prove fuel cell safety and then they probably found the health effect quite quickly.

 


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Manuone
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Manuone
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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2020/8384742/

https://faseb.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1096/fj.201901981R

https://www.ijbs.com/v15p1261.htm

Being bioavailable, regulating inflammation, brain edema and attenuating the mTOR pathway ..... it would be too good to be true


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Daniel
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Guys, I spent a little more time to look into this subject and indeed it looks very promising. Hydrogen seems to have great potential against cancer and other health challenges connected to inflammation. Indeed, it seems that a major mechanism behind this is the modulation of metabolism. I am not sure yet if it makes sense to combine with chemo or radio due to its typical anti-oxidant effects, but there is some literature suggesting that even that may make sense. Maybe I should write a dedicated post on Hydrogen.

J. metabolism is everywhere whether someone like's it or not. We can always debate if metabolic alterations are the origin of cancer and other diseases, but it's importance in cancer and other diseases it is outstanding since metabolism is a cornerstone of cellular function, and thus of life itself. The fact that it has a major impact on cellular function, combined with the fact that it is easier for common people like us to find tools (drugs and supplements) to modulate it, is what makes metabolism a key aspect in oncology that is both actionable, cheap to address, and has already demonstrated to have the potential to extend and improve life of cancer patients.

Thanks a lot for your contribution J and Manuel, which I always very much appreciate.

Kind regards,
Daniel


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Manuone
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7495244/

I keep thinking about hydrogen therapy .....
I think a combination therapy with other therapies may have potential .... apparently it promotes glutamate and glutamine, so it might be interesting to combine it with sodium phenylbutyrate! '!?


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