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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
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I just got back from Mexico city after having done treatment with Dr. Williams this past Monday. The treatment consisted of me being put under general anesthesia, followed by the cryoablation of one large tumour in the liver, along with the injection of three different types of immunotherapy drugs (PD-1, PD-L1, CTLA4 inhibitors).

The actual procedure lasted about two hours. Prior to this, I was hooked up to an IV, had bloodwork drawn twice and was able to speak with Dr. Williams at length about the procedure.

I woke up with minimal pain. My only pain was in my nephrostomy tube site; Dr. Williams assumed that it was because of the anesthetic and the relaxation of those muscles. I took 2mg hydromorphone and the pain ceased and never returned.

About a day after the procedure, I developed a fever of about 39.4 degrees celsius. Generally a low grade fever happens but mine happened to be a bit higher grade. The fever has now subsided to a low grade one (around 37 degrees),  three days after it began.

On top of the procedure, Dr. Williams recommends a list of supplements to increase the efficacy of treatment. Off the top of my head, these include:

Cyclophosphomide, aspirin/celebrex, januvia, Cialis, Pantoprazole, Propranolol, and a probiotic. All are taken at varying schedules (eg. cyclophosphomide is 50mg once every two days; januvia is taken 7 days on, 7 off; Cialis is daily for three months). He also recommended eating a lot of cashews.

 

I'm happy to answer any other questions people may have, and I hope to continue updating everyone as time goes on.


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Daniel
(@daniel)
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Joined: 6 years ago
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Great to hear from you Meech! What is the proposal of dr. Williams as next steps? Also what was the cost so far? Do you have any idea about the doses used for the immuno therapies? Thank you, and again, very nice to hear from you!


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Good to be back, I've been a bit busy with all the treatment stuff so I haven't posted as much. The cost of treatment was about $55,000USD. Typically it's within the $50-60k USD range. Then on top of this, the stay at the hospital and use of their facilities (CT scan room, bloodwork, etc.) is about $2000-$5000 USD depending on your stay. My stay was $2200USD. I will say that the facilities are excellent. You get a very large private room with a TV, your hospital bed, and a pull-out couch type of thing for a visitor, as well as a private bathroom. Nurses come to check in on you quite frequently. From what I understood, this is a "private hospital", so not quite a clinic, and not a crowded state-run hospital.

 

I'm actually unsure of what the doses were but I may try to see if I could get the documentation of my treatment in the coming days.


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Forgot to answer the next steps.

 

The next steps are basically to take the medicines and supplements as recommended and to do CT scans and bloodwork to monitor my condition. He said that the supplements increase the efficacy of the immunotherapy by about 30% so it seems pretty imperative to take it all. Prior to treatment, Dr. Williams' team sent me a dropbox link full of resources/academic journals explaining why these particular drugs help the immunotherapy be more effective.

 

Dr. Williams also mentioned that some cancers are much more challenging to induce a response with, although they aren't impossible. He said colorectal cancer would be one where there are more difficulties. And this can be seen through conventionally administered immunotherapy being a pretty big failure with CRC.


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Daniel
(@daniel)
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Thanks for the details Meech. Expensive indeed. Cryo + imuno could lead to a systemic response. I do not know Januvia and Cialis but all the others are known a enhance the immuno response via different mechanisms. I also added sometime ago some of the ideas on supporting the immune system when doing the immunotheraphies on the Dendritic Cell post and anti PD1 post, in case you may want to have a look at them. Best wishes!


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Thanks Daniel, I'll check it out.


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Emad
 Emad
(@emad)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 8
 

nice to hear from you meech , I strongly believe that things is going good

is this kind of treatments are done in cycles or its just done only once ? probably how much the treatment will remain killing cancer ?

also , did he targets all the big tumors around the body or just targeted the liver tumors ?

 

thank you so much , always wish the best


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  
Posted by: Emad

nice to hear from you meech , I strongly believe that things is going good

is this kind of treatments are done in cycles or its just done only once ? probably how much the treatment will remain killing cancer ?

also , did he targets all the big tumors around the body or just targeted the liver tumors ?

 

thank you so much , always wish the best

Hi Emad,

ideally, the treatment is only done once. For me, he only targeted liver tumours and said that the liver microenvironment is such that inducing a systemic response is more likely when the liver is treated. For example, he said that more often, he tends to see lung tumours shrink if he does the liver, but less frequently will see liver tumours shrink if he treats the lung. It's important to note that the ablation is only a secondary treatment used to induce a better immune response. The immunotherapy is the main treatment.


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Emad
 Emad
(@emad)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 8
 

This sounds very good Meech

Thank you , always love to hear good news from you


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marcosbomber901
(@marcosbomber901)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 93
 

Hi Meech

Can you tell me the dosage of the medicines your doctor Jason Williams recommended after the immunotherapy.Januvia,propranolol,esomeprazole and aspirin/celecoxib.

thank you


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gregg_gaffney@hotmail.com
(@gregg_gaffneyhotmail-com)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
 

Hello all,

 I am new here and have been following your comments for a couple of months. I have stage 4 colon cancer with mets to the liver, lymph nodes, and a nodule on the lung. I do not want to do the chemo or radiation. I have started on panitumimab and doing a bunch of herbs from a healer in the mountains

of mexico who family has been healing people for many generations, who is not known here. The description of the herbs is pretty much all in spanish and the proper scientific names are not there, as well

as being improperly spelled so it will be a real chore figuring out what is what. Is there anyone out there who might know someone who I can forward these names to, so they can be translated into something I can understand. Also I noticed that Meech had had some work done by Dr Williams and was hoping he could let me know how he was doing. I am having real trouble tracking down Dr Williams old clients to find out how they have done over time. He is a very expensive alternative but when you are out of options you are out of options. Has anyone else had work done by Dr Williams in the last couple of years, I noticed he had done some work with 3bp and salinomycin in columbia several years ago but cannot find a trace of what happened to the people he treated or the results from this either. I would really appreciate any help anyone can give me.

Thanx Greg

 


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gregg_gaffney@hotmail.com
(@gregg_gaffneyhotmail-com)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
 

Hello Meech,

 My name is greg from canada and I have been following Dr Williams as well as I can. I cannot seem to find

any old clients of his to find out how they have been doing with his procedures, I am quite interested in his services but just terrified to spend the type of money he wants without doing some thorough research before hand. Do you know of a website or somewhere where these referrals on what the product he is delivering have done. He may be the nicest guy in the world but I need to know how these people are doing and have done with his procedures. I would appreciate any help you can give me and hope you are well.

Thanx Greg 


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faithhope0601@gmail.com
(@faithhope0601gmail-com)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
 

Dear Meech 

Thanks for your detailed response. I am diagnosed with ovarian cancer (Stage 3c Low-grade  serous carcinoma ) and going to seek treatment with Dr William and the protocol is very similar to yours 

How do you feel now and I would like to know if you experienced any other side effects during the past few months, any improvement from the treatment?

Any added information would be helpful as I am scheduled to meet him few weeks.

Thanks 

Faith 

 

 


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  
Posted by: [email protected]

Dear Meech 

Thanks for your detailed response. I am diagnosed with ovarian cancer (Stage 3c Low-grade  serous carcinoma ) and going to seek treatment with Dr William and the protocol is very similar to yours 

How do you feel now and I would like to know if you experienced any other side effects during the past few months, any improvement from the treatment?

Any added information would be helpful as I am scheduled to meet him few weeks.

Thanks 

Faith 

 

 

 

Hey sorry for the late response.

 

The side effects I got in the first month were fevers and joint pain. Now I have itchy skin a ton but I'm unsure if it's from the therapy or other processes but immunotherapy does carry a high chance of skin reactions.

 

My CT in October (6 weeks post procedure) was horrible. My liver was completely covered, new spinal metastases, increase in size and number of lung nodules and tumours. Compression of various vessels.

 

Paradoxically though, I've been feeling way better for the past month and a half or so, than I did leading up to the procedure and in the 1.5 months post procedure. I rarely get liver pain anymore, which was constant before.

 

My troubles come from an anemic state and a sympathetic nervous system issue I got 2.5 years ago. It makes it very hard to get up and walk. But apart from this, and very high fatigue, I feel good. Very little pain, good appetite, etc.

 

I have however developed cachexia and some ascites.

 

I hope the post helps even though it only amounts to "I have no clue what's happening" and again, I'm very sorry for the late reply. I know time is valuable for you all.


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  
Posted by: [email protected]

Hello Meech,

 My name is greg from canada and I have been following Dr Williams as well as I can. I cannot seem to find

any old clients of his to find out how they have been doing with his procedures, I am quite interested in his services but just terrified to spend the type of money he wants without doing some thorough research before hand. Do you know of a website or somewhere where these referrals on what the product he is delivering have done. He may be the nicest guy in the world but I need to know how these people are doing and have done with his procedures. I would appreciate any help you can give me and hope you are well.

Thanx Greg 

Hi Greg.

 

My response is one post above. I'm quoting you in hopes that you get an email notification.


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gregg_gaffney@hotmail.com
(@gregg_gaffneyhotmail-com)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
 

Hello Meech,

 I do not know if the last e-mail I typed up reached you or not, I am an imbecile on the computer. I  was wondering if Dr Williams provided you with any other references in regards to clients of his that had stage 4 colon cancer and came out of the treatment in good shape before he started with you. I am currently taking some immunotherapy in canada now and the skin problems are definatley  there but quite manageable. After that I will be on my own to make a decision on what treatment to take next, as I do not want to do the chemo or radiation. I  sincerely hope you are getting better and the new year finds you up and about and doing fine. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate your response and your time. Again best of luck.

Thanx Greg


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Hi Greg,

 

unfortunately, he actually mentioned that colon cancer has been a bit of a challenge.


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faithhope0601@gmail.com
(@faithhope0601gmail-com)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
 

Dear Meech

Thanks for your response, do you feel the treatment has not helped you and does Dr William have any feedback. 

You have mentioned you did other treatments as well besides this therapy and so you are unsure about what causes these side effects, may I ask what other treatments did u pursue .. I am really trying to find some other patient who had success with his treatment.  

Your valuable input is highly appreciated 

Thanks 

Faith 

 

 


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  
Posted by: [email protected]

Dear Meech

Thanks for your response, do you feel the treatment has not helped you and does Dr William have any feedback. 

You have mentioned you did other treatments as well besides this therapy and so you are unsure about what causes these side effects, may I ask what other treatments did u pursue .. I am really trying to find some other patient who had success with his treatment.  

Your valuable input is highly appreciated 

Thanks 

Faith 

 

 

Hi Faith,

After doing the Williams treatment, I did no other treatments apart from the cocktail of medication that he suggested I take.

Prior to Williams, I did SEF Chemo; some off label therapies; and a strategy to deplete T4. This was all within four or so months before the Williams attempt. For each of those, I either did not tolerate the therapy (side effects like pain), or I had no benefits.

 

Dr. Williams is very responsive and helpful. He takes a while to respond sometimes, as he is busy (up to a week or so). 

Certain side effects may be cancer related or immune related and it's hard to tell as I am late stage. In general, I don't think the therapy helped me too much but to be honest, if you were to see my scans from October, it's a shock I'm still doing as well as I am, so it may be helping.

He has sent me a scan of a woman with my cancer type (Neuroendocrine) with a great complete response after treatment, but in general, I think what you'd hope for is a durable partial response.

 

He seemed very honest about patients it helped, and those whom it didn't help, and I'm sure it's helpful for patients but not all patients. I believe I remember him saying that it helped in more instances than not. 

 

You should send him an introductory email with some questions you have. He was happy to answer my concerns when I first emailed.


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gregg_gaffney@hotmail.com
(@gregg_gaffneyhotmail-com)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
 

Hey Meech,

 I really appreciate your time responding to this, I am still searching, still looking. Best of luck, Merry Christmas and a happy New Year. I really hope things come out well for you. I am taking panitumumab now and it takes some time to work as well.

Take care Greg


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Hoping for all the best for you, Greg. Merry Christmas!


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faithhope0601@gmail.com
(@faithhope0601gmail-com)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
 

thanks so much for your response, really helped me make a decision on my next move, I am very much in touch with Dr William and he is very good with responses to all my detailed questions, it is just that I would always want to know from a  patient perspective how they felt about the treatment but of course we cannot compare and just hope for the best , I wish you all the best and once again thank you for taking your time to respond .


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Meech
(@meech)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 26
Topic starter  

Hi Faith,

It's no problem at all. I'm more than happy to answer any more questions you have, as best I can. 

Wishing you the best, Merry Christmas!


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 240
 

Hi Meech, thanks for giving us so much info on Dr. Williams immune treatment.

Could you please give us an update on your situation? Did you get better after the October 2017 CT scan that looked so ominous? Did the new mets and the enlarged ones shrink? Did your caquexia go away?

What did Dr. Williams say when you told him about it? Did he give you another treatment?

I hope you are feeling much better now.

Thanks!


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Daniel
(@daniel)
Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1039
 

Dear,

Unfortunately, at the beginning of this year Milan has left us  https://www.arbormemorial.ca/glenoaks/obituaries/milan-eskic/15084

Here is a little more about Milan's journey https://www.gofundme.com/bjygvqg4

He was fighting a very rare and aggressive form of cancer. I remember speaking with him back in 2016 when he was doing TACE at Frankfurt University Hospital. That was probably the only treatment that worked for him, for a while. 

Kind regards,
Daniel

 


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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 547
 

D, I just notice recently on the Williams website that he did an intratumoral of 3-BP on a patient in 2005! That is simply startling! The other published patients were almost 10 yeas later than that. It only was after the melanoma patient was published in 2014 that 3-BP became obvious to almost anyone who gave it some thought. Amazing how far ahead of the crowd he was.


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GgE
 GgE
(@gge)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 240
 

Daniel, thanks for letting us all know about the end of Meech’s fight with his rare type of cancer. He was a brave warrior who never gave up. At the same time, he helped many of us by sharing the info he was gathering though his journey. It is a shame such a great young guy did not come on top…May he rest in peace.
Do you (or anyone elses in this forum) know of any clinics, in any country, that uses the same type of therapy as Dr. Williams does in his clinic? I mean injecting reliable immunotherapy drugs right into the tumor. I understand that this is the future of immunotherapy because it is much more effective (it often gets rid off of the tumor and of all mets) and safer (no autoimmune reactions) than giving them intravenous
I know that Stanford is doing a trial on lymphoma patients. I read that by injecting the drugs directly into the tumor the lymphocytes get primed to attack only the tumor cells, and not the rest of the body as it sometimes happen when the drug is given intravenous.

Thanks for any feedback you provide.


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Daniel
(@daniel)
Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1039
 

Dear, Dr. Williams is a man with a good heart and an innovative doctor. I appreciate him and like him because of these reasons. I hope Dr. Williams will employ more metabolic treatments as core therapies. Doing this with TACE will probably give better results.

(updated)

This post was modified 7 months ago 2 times by Daniel
This post was modified 6 months ago by Daniel

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dumbcritic
(@dumbcritic)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 100
 

Dr. Williams presented a case at SITC (Multimodal intratumoral immunotherapy potentiates complete immunologic tumor elimination of breast cancer origin diffuse liver metastases)

Background
Depending on the origin of the primary lesion, patients with distant metastases of aggressive solid tumors have traditionally been deemed incurable. A complete abscopal effect, or cure, is a rare exception rather than the rule. This is secondary to cancer stem cells providing resilience to treatment and propensity to recur after remission (1). Harnessing the potential of the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant cells harboring tumor antigens may allow stage 4 cancer to be completely eliminated from the body (2, 3). This report describes a case of diffuse liver metastases from advanced breast cancer; eliminated immunologically by intratumoral injection of immunostimulatory pharmacotherapy. α-OX40 refers to a stimulatory monoclonal antibody with a dual mechanism of action on T cells designed to potentiate long-term immunity. Activating the OX40 protein triggers a sustained immune response in effector T cells while also potentiating the demise of regulatory T cells. Intratumoral α-OX40 was shown to work synergistically with intratumoral CpG, a toll-like receptor 9 agonist, in a mouse model of breast cancer (4). To our knowledge, this is the first report of an α-OX40 antibody administered intratumorally, in vivo, in a human patient.

Methods
Two liver metastases were treated with combination immunotherapy suspended in montanide, an oil adjuvant. A combination of α-OX40, CpG, ipilimumab, and ketolorac was injected into two accessible, dominant, hepatic lesions under computed tomography guidance with general anesthesia. A CT scan was performed 6 weeks post-procedure, and a PET/CT was performed 12 weeks post-procedure. Tumor markers CA125, CA27.29, and CA15.3 were monitored weekly for 12 weeks post treatment.

Results
No suspicious uptake was noted anywhere in the body on the 12-week post-procedure PET/CT. Complete abrogation of all diffuse liver metastases was documented at that time. At 12 weeks post treatment tumor markers CA125 decreased by 98% to 35 from a baseline of 1767, CA27.29 decreased 93% to 112 from a baseline of 1511, and CA15.3 decreased 93% to 56 from a baseline of 821.

Conclusions
Intratumoral injection allows a much higher proportion of immunotherapy to directly interact with the tumor microenvironment compared to intravenous injection. With intratumoral dosing of multimodal immunotherapy an order of magnitude less than intravenous dosing, a patient with stage 4 breast cancer was able to achieve complete immunologic tumor elimination at 12 weeks follow-up. This durable abscopal effect remains complete 20 weeks post-treatment.

References
1. Kreso A, Dick JE. Evolution of the cancer stem cell model. Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Mar 06,;14(3):275-91.
2. Rosenberg MA, Williams J. Image guided cryoablation of cancer with intra-tumoral injection of anti-CTLA-4 and PD-1 immune check-point inhibitors. Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer. 2015;3(2):P142.
3. Soule E, Bandyk M, Matteo J. Percutaneous ablative cryoimmunotherapy for micrometastaic abscopal effect: No complications. Cryobiology. 2018 06;82:22-6.
4. sagiv-Barfi I, Czerwinski DK, Levy R. In Situ Vaccination with a TLR9 Agonist and Anti-OX40 Antibody Leads to Tumor Regression and Induces Abscopal Responses in Murine Lymphoma. Blood. 2016;128(22):1847.


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dumbcritic
(@dumbcritic)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 100
 

A case series [1] and Dr. Onik is doing a similar procedure to Dr. Williams. From it (I've edited it slightly): ''27 consecutive patients with metastatic cancers (21 with prostate and 6 with other cancers), were treated by in situ cryosurgical lysis of tumour tissue followed by injection of yervoy, keytruda or opdivo, and sargramostim (GM-CSF) directly into the zone of lysis. This was followed by 30 daily s.c. injections of sargramostim. Patients received 1 to 3 cycles of the above therapy at intervals of ≥ 1 month. Responses to therapy were assessed by RECIST v.1.1 [2] and for patients with prostate, serum PSA levels.

 

21 patients with progressive metastatic prostate and 6 with other metastatic cancers (2 bladder, 1 pancreatic, 1 colon, 1 melanoma, and 1 unknown) were treated. RECIST responses for 2 patients (both with prostate) could not be evaluated due to a lack of follow-up imaging. Among the remaining 25 patients, complete responses were seen in 9 (36%) patients and a partial response in 1 (4%), for an overall response rate of 40%. Stable disease was seen in 8 (32%) patients, and progression was seen in 7 (28%).

 

Among the 19 evaluable prostate patients, there were 9 (47%) complete responses and no partial responses, for an overall response rate of 47%. 5 (26%) patients showed stable disease, and 5 (26%) progressed. 13/21 (62%) of patients had post-therapy PSA reductions of >50%. 12 patients were ADT-naïve (11 evaluable by RECIST) and there were 9 with mCRPC (8 evaluable by RECIST), and positive responses were seen in both groups, with overall response rates of 55% and 38%, respectively, and PSA reductions of > 50% in 75% and 44% of patients, respectively.

 

These antitumour responses have been durable in many patients, with complete responses to date ranging from 1 to over 4.5 years post-treatment. Encouragingly, this durability of response was observed both in ADT-naïve patients and in those with mCRPC. Therapy was well tolerated, with adverse events in 19/27 (70%) of patients. 24 grade 1-2 (mild or moderate) adverse events were seen in 19 (70%) patients, and 8 grade 3-4 (severe or life threatening) adverse events were seen in 5 (19%) patients. Notably, included liver enzyme elevations, hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, all of which are associated with autoimmune responses to immunotherapy. One death that was possibly treatment-related, 4 disease-related deaths, and 2 unrelated deaths occurred.

 

Refs:

1 https://www.abstractsonline.com/pp8/#!/9045/presentation/7023

2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Response_evaluation_criteria_in_solid_tumors


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