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Re-puporsed drugs to treat NSCLC, ROS1-positive

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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Here are a few suggestions for reducing lactate:

Targeting the enzymes involved in lactate production
=============================================
Sodium bicarbonate, Magnesium carbonate, citric acid, alpha lipoic acid.

Inhibiting the glycolytic pathway, glycolysis, Warburg effect
=====================================
Methylene blue, Phloretin, Berberine

Blocking the Akt/mTOR pathway
====================
Rapamycin

Targeting lactate transporters
===================
Sodium citrate

Targeting lactic acid bacteria.
==================
Caprylic acid, Allicin

Inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase.
=======================
Sodium-Butyrate

Antioxidants
============
Vitamin C, lycopene, catechins, etc.


   
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Daniel
(@daniel)
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@dng050 Albendazole is another option for HIF inhibition https://bmccancer.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2407-10-143

Kind regards,

Daniel


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

I wonder if Dr. Max Gerson was right when he claimed that diseased cells contained too much sodium and too little potassium, or if it is really the ammonia displacing the potassium from the cell's interior that is leading to lowered respiration and eventually leading to a shift from cellular respiration to glycolysis.


   
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Daniel
(@daniel)
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@j Hi J,

A short comment from my side due to time constrains: Sodium has indeed a major role, via Na/H exchange that is known to be overactive in many cancers. I addressed this subject here pH in Cancer & Tumor Acidification: A Top Treatment Strategy - Cancer Treatments - from Research to Application (cancertreatmentsresearch.com)

This leads to the alkalinization of the intracellular space and as a result a shift to glyco.

Kind regards,
Daniel


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Posted by: @daniel

@j Hi J,

A short comment from my side due to time constrains: Sodium has indeed a major role, via Na/H exchange that is known to be overactive in many cancers. I addressed this subject here pH in Cancer & Tumor Acidification: A Top Treatment Strategy - Cancer Treatments - from Research to Application (cancertreatmentsresearch.com)

This leads to the alkalinization of the intracellular space and as a result a shift to glyco.

Kind regards,
Daniel

In his clinical practice, David Brownstein, MD has observed that the opposite is the case. In fact, he recommends adding sea salt and Celtic salt to the diet of cancer patients. Those salts are 30 to 40% sodium. Sodium is an essential mineral, necessary for proper insulin regulation in the body, etc. Ammonium/ammonia on the other hand is just plain toxic, which is why the body has complex systems to get rid of it and metabolize it to less toxic forms such as glutamine. But cancer cells have increased levels of glutamine synthase activity and use glutamine as energy source. 

 


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Marine life would be plagued with cancer if it was the sodium 😋


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
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I postulate that a) ammonium can replace potassium and b) high ammonia increases sodium in the cell. Thus, you need to get rid of the ammonia, not the sodium.


   
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Daniel
(@daniel)
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@j Hi J. Thank you for sharing the points above. There are many that have observed many things and have drawn many conclusions, some good some less good. In my comment above I am not discussing specific observations and related conclusions that may or may of represent the real mechanisms behind depending on the "experimental" condition, but the well-established science indicating that Na/H transporter is highly active in many cancers and part of the fuel for that transporter in Na. Inhibition of that is not always but often connected with cell acidification and death. 

Of course, this is one piece of the puzzle from a scientific point of view and can be others that can have a higher weight and impact on the overall outcome.

Regarding marine life, of course we are not discussing the origin of cancer here but mechanisms that facilitate tumor evolution.

Finally, the fact that this mechanism exists (Na/H upregulated, more Na in the cell, more acidity outside the cell) doesn't mean that we should stop the use of Na that is an essential mineral important for the human body, but it does mean that we should not overuse that and that modulation of Na/H in cancer represents an opportunity that can lead to tumor modulation as well.

I agree Ammonium/ammonia is something that is good to address specifically if that jumps up as it can even be lethal, specifically during TLS. I discussed some points on how to address that about 8 years ago here If TLS (Tumor lysis syndrome) occurs - Cancer Treatments - from Research to Application (cancertreatmentsresearch.com)  including Phenylbutyrate to lower ammonia levels and Bumetanide to reduce negative impact of ammonia on brain when that reaches dangerous levels.

Sorry for my rare interventions here but one day I will be back 🙂

Kind regards,
Daniel


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Posted by: @daniel

@j Hi J. Thank you for sharing the points above. There are many that have observed many things and have drawn many conclusions, some good some less good. In my comment above I am not discussing specific observations and related conclusions that may or may of represent the real mechanisms behind depending on the "experimental" condition, but the well-established science indicating that Na/H transporter is highly active in many cancers and part of the fuel for that transporter in Na. Inhibition of that is not always but often connected with cell acidification and death. 

Of course, this is one piece of the puzzle from a scientific point of view and can be others that can have a higher weight and impact on the overall outcome.

Regarding marine life, of course we are not discussing the origin of cancer here but mechanisms that facilitate tumor evolution.

Finally, the fact that this mechanism exists (Na/H upregulated, more Na in the cell, more acidity outside the cell) doesn't mean that we should stop the use of Na that is an essential mineral important for the human body, but it does mean that we should not overuse that and that modulation of Na/H in cancer represents an opportunity that can lead to tumor modulation as well.

I agree Ammonium/ammonia is something that is good to address specifically if that jumps up as it can even be lethal, specifically during TLS. I discussed some points on how to address that about 8 years ago here If TLS (Tumor lysis syndrome) occurs - Cancer Treatments - from Research to Application (cancertreatmentsresearch.com)  including Phenylbutyrate to lower ammonia levels and Bumetanide to reduce negative impact of ammonia on brain when that reaches dangerous levels.

Sorry for my rare interventions here but one day I will be back 🙂

Kind regards,
Daniel

 

Aha! PB, indeed. We've come full circle!

https://www.nature.com/articles/pr199131.pdf

A few peptides can cause cancer to go into complete remission. Exceptional cases but still, it's the elephant in the room, Daniel. Even on this forum, we've seen it happen.

https://synergiesforcancertreatments.blogspot.com/p/17-year-glioblastoma-survivor.html

Have a great weekend!

 


   
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Daniel
(@daniel)
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@j I knew you wanted to get to PB 😀 

Have a very nice weekend!


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Posted by: @daniel

@j I knew you wanted to get to PB 😀 

Have a very nice weekend!

Not exactly, but it emphasizes the message or hypothesis  I'm trying to convey

Cheers

 


   
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dng050
(@dng050)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 59
Topic starter  

After tapering off the tablet medicine, my brother is not well. While waiting for chemo/immunotherapy, we will try intravenous vitamin C. Are there ways to add synergy to IVC?

Here is our current protocol:

- fenbendazole, 444 mg twice a day
- IVC (50 grams) two to three days per week
- Ginsenosides 
- LDN (low-dose naltrexone)
- Doxycycline, 100 mg once a day 

While on IVC, we are thinking about pausing all supplements which might have an antioxidant, like curcumin, r-lipoic acid and hydrogen gas. 

dng050 


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

@dng050 

 

 

Anti-inflammation and anti-cancer effects of Naringenin combination with Artemisinins in human lung cancer cells

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2452014422000401

Don't get attached to any treatment options, if it's not working you need to switch asap.

I've attached an excel spreadsheet with more ideas.

 

 


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Posted by: @dng050

Here is our current protocol:

- fenbendazole, 444 mg twice a day
- IVC (50 grams) two to three days per week
- Ginsenosides 
- LDN (low-dose naltrexone)
- Doxycycline, 100 mg once a day 

While on IVC, we are thinking about pausing all supplements which might have an antioxidant, like curcumin, r-lipoic acid and hydrogen gas. 

dng050 

In this en vivo study (colon cancer), Doxycycline upregulated the expression of NF-κB, MMP-9 & VEGF, downregulated p53, cytochrome-c, caspase-3 & caspase-9 expression.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4801417/

Something to be aware of.

 

 

 


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine potentiates synergistically anti-cancer property of artemisinin by promoting ROS dependent apoptosis

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25308836/


   
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dng050
(@dng050)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 59
Topic starter  

@j I think we will do (far-infrared) sauna to increase blood flow before the IVC. Although worried about the heat shock proteins might assist cancer cells, we hope the potential advantage might outweigh the risk. 

We will also be adding magnesium before IVC, thanks for the idea.


   
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 1240
 

Posted by: @dng050

@j I think we will do (far-infrared) sauna to increase blood flow before the IVC. Although worried about the heat shock proteins might assist cancer cells, we hope the potential advantage might outweigh the risk. 

We will also be adding magnesium before IVC, thanks for the idea.

Good luck!

 


   
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