"Cancer Simplified - From Cause to Elimination"  

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johan
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01/07/2019 5:05 pm  

A very interesting ebook by Mark Simon, Founder and Director Nutritional Oncology Research Institute

https://docdro.id/IXYo1BA (ebook in PDF format)


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Jcancom
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02/07/2019 1:06 am  

Good one johan!

I have been thinking of what a more comprehensive dietary plan would look like for some time now. Cancer patients should routinely seek out the advice of an oncological nutritionist. What I was considering in particular was an elemental diet.

EVERYTHING that I cancer consumes nutritionally should be carefully contemplated. I am not sure if this is entirely possible but it might be worthwhile to purchase each essential chemical needed by the body in bulk and then carefully administer what is needed. The nearly complete lack of understanding of what people typically consume in their diets must have a profoundly important role in our current cancer epidemic. Controlling the intake of the various chemical components could be a valuable first step towards controlling cancer. Methionine restriction was a good suggestion for your link; there are others.  

 


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johan
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02/07/2019 3:40 am  

Thanks, Jcancom!

Leucine is another one:

LLGL2 rescues nutrient stress by promoting leucine uptake in ER+ breast cancer

"Our findings in the lab demonstrate that decreasing leucine levels suppresses proliferation of tumour cells, whereas increasing leucine enhances it. Furthermore, the findings open up the possibility that a low-leucine diet could be beneficial for patients with ER-breast cancer."

And yet again, foods with the highest levels of leucine are mostly animal products. 

Casein, found in milk products, is another one to avoid or restrict.

 

 


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Jcancom
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14/07/2019 11:07 pm  

johan,

donc focused my attention onto cancer and diet. I was highly impressed with his contemplation of everything that he put into his body. Many people, including many cancer patients, consume food without apparent attention. They can consume 100s of grams of carbohydrates apparently without concern. A scientific diet would likely be of benefit for many cancer patients.

Patients could start off establishing a baseline of what they are eating and go from there. It probably would be quite startling to make such a determination. One might anticipate that some people have extremely poor diets. From there, diet restriction of carbs ( or even zero carbs), calorie restriction, amino restriction etc. could be added in. A well coordinated treatment strategy might be quite helpful, as it would have the advantage of being essentially metronomic in character. 

 


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johan
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14/07/2019 11:56 pm  

Hi J,

I understand it's hard for medical doctors to get people to change their diets but they should let that choice to their patients. Just as smoking causes lung cancer and heart disease, the wrong food choices can lead to cancer and many other diseases. The argument continues to be that once you have cancer it really doesn't matter any longer but the science is there to prove diet can affect most if not all hallmarks of cancer.

I was reading about tamoxifen last night, in the sixties it was called ICI46, and they had to market it for other uses (oral contraceptive) as there was a lack of interest in breast cancer therapies at that time! How things have changed in just 50 years. So have our diets.

 

 


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Jcancom
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15/07/2019 2:27 am  

Thank you johan, for your reply.

Yes, oncological nutrition makes a great deal of sense to me.  One might think that it would be a central treatment strategy for all cancer patients.

I think people would be well advised upon receiving a cancer diagnosis to go somewhere that have very low incidence/mortaility rates for that cancer or at the very least try to understand and emulate their dietary patterns. This reality is still evident in the world even today, as for example Asia typically has much lower rates of breast, prostate etc. cancers.

For example (prostate cancer):  http://gco.iarc.fr/today/online-analysis-table?v=2018&mode=population&mode_population=countries&population=900&populations=900&key=asr&sex=1&cancer=27_41&type=1&statistic=5&prevalence=0&population_group=0&ages_group%5B%5D=0&ages_group%5B%5D=17&nb_items=5&group_cancer=1&include_nmsc=1&include_nmsc_other=1

One could certainly wonder whether we are actually comparing apples and apples, though it does make one pause.

It speaks exactly to the metabolic imbalance that is present in modern peoples. The first metabolic explorers to  the New Worlds did not have to look very far to see how much healthier in many respects (e.g. cancer) many "primitive" peoples were. 

Removing the gross excess of carbs in modern diets would seem to be an obvious first step for most cancer patients. The evidence in animal models appears  quite convincing: reducing glucose levels reduces tumor growth. I am not sure whether this strategy has been consistently applied by any of our posters on forum.

Cancers usually take in glucose and then excrete lactate. However, lactate could be converted back into glucose. So adding in yet more glucose to feed the cancer cells might be recognized as somewhat unnecessary. There are metabolic strategies that have been suggested that directly target the key energy pathways of cancer.

 

 


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johan
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15/07/2019 3:29 am  
Posted by: @jcancom

....

Cancers usually take in glucose and then excrete lactate. However, lactate could be converted back into glucose. So adding in yet more glucose to feed the cancer cells might be recognized as somewhat unnecessary. There are metabolic strategies that have been suggested that directly target the key energy pathways of cancer.

 

 

yes! The Circle of Lactate: How cancer cells can reuse their own waste


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Jcancom
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15/07/2019 3:57 am  

johan, exactly! Then why do cancer patients consume all this glucose? When you think about it, it makes no sense!

What if one were to simply stop the inflow of glucose and then let the body cycle lactate --> glucose --> Lactate; this probably could not be done indefinitely as the energy state is constantly being run down, though I would be very interested to see if this simple strategy could result in a greatly reduced level of lactate in circulation.

Lactate is one of the most destructive aspects of cancer biology. It creates so many downstream problems: immunological, pH, ... . Controlling lactate would seem at an objective level to be a central goal in managing cancer. With a low glucose strategy, possibly combined with exercise, one might be able to achieve such a result. At the same time, end stage cancer patients can have truly overwhelming lactate levels. It is not obvious to me that high lactate levels would ever be inevitable if proper glucose etc. strategies were in place.     

 


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johan
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15/07/2019 4:46 am  

@jcancom

indeed the main culprit of increasing lactate levels is cancer, as it grows, so reducing those levels must be done on all levels simultaneously, introducing anti-cancer drugs and natural compounds, reducing glucose and using any other safe method to get those levels down, before it's irreversible.

But it's hard to wean off sugar and as long as oncologists don't scare their patients and tell them to drop the stuff or die, only a few will take this route.


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Jcancom
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16/07/2019 4:41 am  

I have liked these ones for quite some time. Most of the posters on our forum never seem to decrease their glucose levels even when adhering to a ketogenic calorie reduced diet.

We have never even tried this super basic strategy of pushing down glucose levels! It is the most basic of all metabolic strategies. It would take some time to properly keto-adapt, though once this is achieved glucose levels apparently could be brought down to absurd levels. The famine victims they mention had glucose levels below 40 etc. which is quite starling! Apparently this caused no side-effects. Article goes on to talk about starvation in humans coupled with insulin that brought glucose levels down to 9! Yet, we know that lowering glucose levels will reduce cancer growth. This seems to happen at much higher levels in humans, though any references on this question would be appreciated. The results in lab models are impressive.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25579853

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=30037608


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johan
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16/07/2019 8:12 pm  

Amazing results indeed.

For many people going on KD doesn't translate into immediate lower blood glucose, I'm no expert on this but from what I've read there are many variables at play which differ from one person to another. For example, stress can raise blood glucose (via cortisol). Obesity and many other factors play a role. 


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Jcancom
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18/07/2019 11:03 pm  

johan, looking good! You have the most stylish avatar on forum!

 


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johan
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19/07/2019 12:05 am  

lol, the one I got from the forum was just too grumpy!


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