1,000,000 Total Visitors! Well done D! Well done team!  

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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
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18/09/2019 5:04 pm  

The site has hit 1Meg and we are still going strong! This is a substantial achievement especially in light of the fact that we have now seen unmistakable benefits in those who have pursued metabolic cancer approaches as suggested here.

Thank you everyone for adding to the knowledge base and helping the others who will need it when they too embark on their cancer journeys.  


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Daniel
(@daniel)
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18/09/2019 5:37 pm  

Hi J, thanks for your post. Actually I was thinking I should write a short post on this, anticipating that 1.000.000 visitors will be reached towards the end of the month. But there is now an explosion of visitors from Korea as Fenbendazole story just became viral there too. It's amazing to see in real time how a story becomes viral. Yes J, let's keep up and create more and more value for people in need! Like I said, it;s always a pleasure to see your never ending enthusiasm! Of course I see you take some brake from time to time to regain your energy 😀


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johan
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18/09/2019 5:58 pm  

@daniel

Congratulations on reaching this milestone and a big thank you for all you're doing Daniel! Keep on going!!!

 


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Daniel
(@daniel)
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18/09/2019 6:48 pm  

@johan

A big thank you, to you too Johan for all your valuable contributions! 


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Shanti
(@shanti)
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19/09/2019 4:39 am  

Wow! congratulations on a job well done! 


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nissim
(@nissim)
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19/09/2019 11:09 am  

Dear @daniel,

We feel like we just begin to understand and reveal the valuable articles and information in your blog!

  It is indeed a huge multiplier for our ability to reach the relevant information and drop the non-relevant one, as we feel like standing in front of an ocean of information with a bucket in our hand, trying to empty this ocean...

  1,000,000 might seems as just some number but I hope that it will be another trigger to help us encourage doctors, oncologists and cancer treating community to look into and adopt non SOC low-risk therapies, as we all know the SOC is simply not enough and other strategies are currently ignored/ neglected by the main stream therapy providers.

 

Many many thanks for your efforts and help and best wishes and health to all!

Regards, Nissim

 

 


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Daniel
(@daniel)
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20/09/2019 12:19 am  

@Shanti @nissim

Thanks a lot! Best wishes to all indeed, and a lot of health! 

 


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Daniel
(@daniel)
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20/09/2019 12:22 am  

@Jcancom

Since we speak about this milestone it also makes a lot of sense to speak about 3BP, the substance due to which I decided to start this website. Here is a new article on 3BP that you may like to read:

Diverse Stakeholders of Tumor Metabolism: An Appraisal of the Emerging Approach of Multifaceted Metabolic Targeting by 3-Bromopyruvate https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6620530/


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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
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21/09/2019 7:13 pm  

Thank you D. Yes, I saw that one a months ago when it was pre-pubmed. 🙃 {I am not much of emojier, though I thought I should try it out.}

It is true that I have stepped back from the forum for the last while. It has felt so great to charge up those batteries again.Another aspect that I have been struggling with is: What is the next direction to take with the research? We have found so many potentially useful treatments, how can we create a rational treatment plan with our results? I have also thought that I should investigate the books written for the general cancer population. I have focused mostly on the recent research base in articles, though the wider view could also be helpful.

It is heartening when you have built something up to watch whether others will step into a gap or will merely step back from the challenge: sometimes in life when some people do all the rowing, others no longer know how to themselves. Yet, on this forum we have such a deep bench that when one member pulls back there is another wave of replacements. I will have to watch out for this youngster johan. If I am not careful, he could assume the j mantle. However, as I said it is such an honor that this is in fact true. 

It is also encouraging that mainstream medicine is now offering patients treatments with increasing success. 5 year survival for metastatic melanoma at almost 40% is not great, though is a tremendous improvement from not the distant past. 

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1904059

 

   


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johan
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21/09/2019 8:38 pm  

I feel very much the same way, J. Certain strategies to tackle cancer seem so good it's hard to believe the lack of follow-through. Or at least that is how it seems. But it's exciting to see how this site is growing and receiving more visitors each day. I think this will eventually help bring about the focus we're looking for.

 


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Yudaitheska
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22/09/2019 12:08 am  

What has fascinated me from the beginning is the fact that with a metabolic approach to cancer the treatment becomes somewhat easier...not that scary for patients. And I'm glad that following this approach more people can be helped, people that don't have much money, and the metabolic approach doesn't equal BROKE for most people. Thank you for all your work


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Jcancom
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22/09/2019 1:14 am  

Yud, thank you for your interesting comments on forum. Yes, you are totally right about the metabolic approach.

I am not aware of anyone within the metabolic cancer framework who is an MD, but it is exactly what immediately attracts people who aren't MDs and want to figure things out for themselves. When you actually go to cancer textbooks they do not even mention metabolics. I am speechless! How can you talk about cancer without talking metabolics? It is very weird. If I had to post about the non-metabolic side of cancer I would be almost totally stumped. What is there to say? Almost everything flows through the metabolic pathways. It should be no real mystery to anyone that many high end scientists (Warburg ...) were intuitively attracted to cancer metabolics. 

Oftentimes successful cancer drugs that are supposedly non-metabolic have as a primary or at least important mechanism of action metabolic biology. Sometimes even high tech medicinal chemistry with nM potency and very end science winds up being ultimately a tweaker of metabolism. One can hit a target very very specifically yet what happens then as it propagates through the network? 

With your first point, again, exactly right. I do not think people often appreciate how profound the anti-cancer effects have been with metabolics, this is even more true because there are often so few side effects. The 3-BP liver patient with his first dose of 3-BP felt better almost right away on the first day and wanted to go out for dinner. This is very startling. He had had no appetite for months and was not in great condition. The next dosing round was almost fatal because of a massive massive TLS response. Yet, once again there were mild if any actual direct treatment toxicity. Same with the 3-BP melanoma patient: entire tumor mass shut down. Metabolics can produce large responses fairly often without side effects.

People have this idea that cancer treatment must hurt to work: no pain, no gain. For me the real logic is more like: if there is pain something is wrong. With Bracht, I would have immediately asked for NAC when things started to go wrong right from the start. Shutting down a tumor mass under proper control should create such side effects. This is a constantly recurring feature of metabolic treatment: vitamin C, sal, ... there can be substantial anti-cancer effects with few side effects which can increase risk for people unaware of this feature.

The big problem is that we do not have the solid protocols that exist for mainstream treatments. Doctors are not allowed typically to go off the drug list to help their patients. I think that it would be such a victory for medicine if this were more clearly defined. I am unsure whether those without the needed training should dispense medical suggestions; yet as we have seen at some point in the treatment cycle doctors simply have nothing left that they can offer and then they are almost compelled to release their patients even when this means that no treatment can be given. 


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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
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22/09/2019 1:25 am  

johan, yes there are so many new people. It is so gratifying to see this. It feels like we have reached a critical mass where a self-sustaining process has been created. It can be difficult when the same builders need to keep on building forever and a liftoff is never reached.

However, there is so much value that has been accumulated here that people will tend to gravitate to it. One can even feel a network effect occurring in which isolated people all over the world who have a piece of the puzzle can be integrated into our collective effort. I would tend to agree with the idea that we are stronger together. There are different flavors of treatments (e.g. vitamin C) that can add a different variant if another protocol is not effective. One of my big aha moments was realizing that probably many of these apparently separate approaches at a fundamental level are likely quite similar in terms of pathway involved. There are only a few central pathways open to metabolics. One of the tasks that perhaps we should dedicate ourselves to is bringing together the treatments suggested on thread. For someone starting off with no clue, a list of nice and safe and mostly easily available treatments would be of great help. Some of these are readily available, though such people would need to have a certain skill level.      


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johan
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22/09/2019 3:35 am  

J, on the one hand, I like the idea of distilling all the various options into a sort of protocol. On the other hand, I feel we may just have to let it emerge organically. And help this process with useful pointers. Which I think is going on already here and probably on other sites on the internet.

Yud raises an important point. Modern medicine may have promising treatments in the pipeline, but at what cost? Albert A. Bartlett, in a presentation on arithmetics gave an example of the cost escalation of bladder surgery, which in 1950 cost USD360. By 1975 the same surgery already cost USD2200. So he noted that considering the inflation rate of the cost of the surgery (aprox 10% per year) "the lesson is awfully clear - if you're thinking about gall bladder surgery, do it now!" 

 


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Yudaitheska
(@yudaitheska)
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22/09/2019 9:21 am  

I remember the time I first stumbled upon the idea of altering cancer metabolism, I was reading a blog :healing cancer naturally and all over the place there was this Budwig diet thing... I didn't know what to think I hadn't read her books but I saw people where using it to treat their pets cancer. So I told my brother who is a Vet and we started treating animals with only the cottage cheese and the flax seed oíl as well as meat, chicken and vegetables no artificial food and we were amazed by the results so I felt I had found something quite interesting... Time passed by and I had a patient with prostate cancer who had been given up by oncologists, I told him about the Budwig mix and asked him to remove all artificial food and sugars added, this was a bed ridden patient with metastases in his groin and bones with lots of pain and 4 months later he was riding his bike full of life, then he went to the oncologist and was advised to take Zometa for a small dot in one of his knees on the bone gammagram and he died after a few doses everyone said he died of cancer I started treating other people but soon I realized that the only chance of helping someone was if I saw them before they started any chemo... Of the few that have survived they later develop side effects from chemo/cytotoxic/cytostatic medication... I'm glad to learn about so many more options to help my patients


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