Fasting as an anti-cancer strategy  

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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 100
08/02/2019 12:12 am  

I do not think that we have emphasized enough the importance of fasting as an anti-cancer strategy.  The below study is quite startling: Simply fasting for 13 hours overnight had a substantial influence on cancer recurrence in breast cancer. 13 hours? That is hardly even eating at 6 PM and then again at 7 AM. Isn't that almost the expected pattern of eating? Do people (especially breast cancer patients) snack after their evening meal? The below study found that each additional 2 hours of fasting added yet more benefit.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27032109

This was a real eye opener for me. Apparently the reduction in recurrence seen in this study is at the same level as that found with chemotherapy. Given this, it is highly discouraging that such a simple metabolic strategy has not been extensively studied before. I would be extremely interested in seeing follow on studies that perhaps extended out the fasting interval to perhaps 24 .. 48 .. 72 .. 240 hours .. . They could also try intermittent fasting such as a paleo zero carb diet with daily ketogenic time restricted feeding. The arrival of continuous glucose monitoring could take the guess work out of diet recall.

Considering the highly disappointing results from the TAILORX breast cancer study (specifically 85% of women with early breast cancer ( those with an identifiable genetic signature) received no benefited from traditional preventative treatments. How can metabolic therapies that have shown the success noted above now not be aggressively funded and researched?  

 

 


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Jcancom
(@jcancom)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 100
08/02/2019 2:53 am  

This is exciting! I was wondering whether reports of cancer patients trying prolonged water only fasts might be in the literature. Apparently, recently a report of a 21 day water only fast was reported for a cancer patient which resulted in a long term remission (see the two articles below). There are some caveats here: The type of cancer involved stage IIIa, low-grade follicular lymphoma is highly treatable with current therapies, so one wonders to what extent it is ethical to not first give standard of care. Also this type of cancer appears to have prolonged survival so it is not obvious how effective the diet intervention was. 

The next two urls are large scale fasting studies that showed that these approaches are quite safe though the studies were not constructed to screen for cancer patients. Water only fasting over prolonged periods does appear to have substantial potential for cancer therapy. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30093470

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26655228

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29458369

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314618/pdf/pone.0209353.pdf


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