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Dietary restriction of amino acids for Cancer therapy


johan
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This is a good article IMO

https://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12986-020-00439-x

Here, integrated analyses and comprehensive summaries for the abundances, signalling and functions of amino acids in proteomes, metabolism, immunity and food compositions, suggest that, intermittent dietary lysine restriction with normal maize as an intermittent staple food for days or weeks, might have the value and potential for cancer prevention or therapy.  

I have attached an image some food choices for both a low lysine diet and a low serine diet. See a pattern?


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johan
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<img src=” https://ibb.co/Nm5JX6D”>


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johan
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<img src=” ”>


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johan
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that's better. 

Note that serine restriction might be particularly of value in the treatment of p53-deficient tumors.

Personally, carbohydrates-restricted diets don't seem like good choices especially not in the long term.


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johan
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Also, note that the foods I put in that image are just a selection.

For a complete list check out these links:

https://www.medindia.net/nutrition-data/nutrients/low-lysine-foods.htm

https://wholefoodcatalog.info/nutrient/serine/foods/low/


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johan
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Another consideration when looking at dietary options is the effect on the microbiome. A low-carb, high-fat (or high-protein) diet may reduce butyrate production. 

The present study suggests that 1 month of KD significantly reduce SCFA production. Since SCFA produced by gut microbiota exert many health promoting effects on either the gut environment or human metabolism, these results open a new branch of investigation into KD effects

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnut.2021.613100/full


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toobs1234
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@j this is especially true for those doing immunotherapy. I don't have the reference handy, but I read one study that found patients who had a "good" microbiome and fed it lots of fermentable fiber were 5 times more likely to have a response to various types of immunotherapy.


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toobs1234
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@j this is especially true for those doing immunotherapy. I don't have the reference handy, but I read one study that found patients who had a "good" microbiome and fed it lots of fermentable fiber were 5 times more likely to have a response to various types of immunotherapy. Good bacteria also like low methionine diets. Animal products are high in methionine.


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johan
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Posted by: @toobs

@j this is especially true for those doing immunotherapy. I don't have the reference handy, but I read one study that found patients who had a "good" microbiome and fed it lots of fermentable fiber were 5 times more likely to have a response to various types of immunotherapy. Good bacteria also like low methionine diets. Animal products are high in methionine.

wow, amazing! 


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dumbcritic
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Faeth Therapeutics is trying to exploit the differences in metabolism and nutrient uptake between healthy and cancerous cells by using a machine learning-driven discovery platform, which is designed to uncover the precise nutrient vulnerabilities based on genotype, organ of origin, and therapy. They have generated preclinical data showing that precisely designed diets can not only have a therapeutic impact, but could also potentially improve responses to other therapies https://www.faeththerapeutics.com/science


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Eriem
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The aminoacids in general?


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