Stage 4 CRC/Metasta...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Stage 4 CRC/Metastatic to the Liver

Page 1 / 2

ZED85
(@zed85)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

For some background, my wife was diagnosed in her 30s with Stage 3a and 1b breast cancer (different cancers, each breast) during a post partum appointment after giving birth to twins (they are now 6).  She was young, and didn't know much genetic history, and showed positivity for BRCA2. 

She had surgery/chemo/rad and there was no breast cancer reoccurrence, although she was diagnosed with stage 1 thyroid a year later.  Her thyroid was removed although later the diagnosis was inconclusive rather than malignant.

Approximately 2 years ago my wife began having significant pain in her abdomen.  She had been scoped a year prior after some gastric complaints, so CRC was not believed to be the cause.  However, after numerous appointments were done and nothing was learned, she was given a CAT scan which spotted dozens of lesions ranging in size on her liver.  Surgery was ruled out.  A biopsy showed this to be metastatic crc.  She was given chemo therapy, and did an ironotecan/5FU regimen every 2 weeks which initially worked well, brought her tumor markers down, and shrunk the liver tumors (no real solid colon tumor was found, cat scans initially showed some inflammation/fuzziness in her colon but cleaned up).  Approximately 1 year ago she changed to a less aggressive treatment for work/life balance, getting chemo every 3 weeks, and the cancer in her liver began to grow again.

We have since changed back to a biweekly treatment, which initially saw some success again, but seems to have stopped working.  My wife has been undergoing chemo in some way shape or form for approximately 2 years, and with declining efficacy and no quality of life we are talking other options.  She skipped her last treatment, approximately a week ago.

I had looked into ivermectin awhile back, as it showed anti-cancer efficacy and some potentiation of chemo therapy, but my wife's onc said it was too liver toxic.  I continued looking into other anti-virals and anti-parasitics and stumbled upon menbendazole and fenbendazole.  I brought the menben research to the onc, who essentially repeated her warnings on liver toxicity and said that she would not prescribe an RX off label as an experiment.  

For the past week, I have put my wife essentially on the Joe Tippens protocol, slightly modified.  I split the fenben dose in two, one in the AM one in the PM, both with food.  She takes the E and Curcumin as well.  I also have her taking 5000IUs of D (I noticed the Sunshine Trial), 500mg of Quercetin, and 120mg of Melatonin (Melatonin showed efficacy in "Five Year-Survival with High-Dose Melatonin and Other Antitumor Pineal Hormones in Advanced Cancer Patients Eligible for the Only Palliative Therapy March 26, 2018").  We do have Xeloda and the PARP inhibitor around the house, although my wife is not currently taking them.  I am not against giving her Xeloda or a PARP inhibitor if they will work, although as far as I know Xeloda is just 5FU in pill form and we seem to have run into drug resistance issues. 

Do you have any advice beyond what we are doing?  We also have a low dose Selenium, Zinc, and AHCC around the house.  My wife currently takes an SNRI, synthroid, hydros for pain, and propranalol for migraines.  I can buy whatever else, although my wife probably only has 30-40% of her liver.

Our kids are 13, 8, 7, and the twins are 6.  For all but the eldest, their mom has been varying degrees of sick for most of their lives.  Watching my wife go through all of this has been hard, but we sign up for better or worse when we get married and we soldier on.  That said, seeing the impact on the kids has been excruciating.

 


Quote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 
Posted by: @zed85

For some background, my wife was diagnosed in her 30s with Stage 3a and 1b breast cancer ...

My wife has been undergoing chemo in some way shape or form for approximately 2 years, and with declining efficacy and no quality of life we are talking other options.  She skipped her last treatment, approximately a week ago.

.....

Do you have any advice beyond what we are doing?  We also have a low dose Selenium, Zinc, and AHCC around the house.  My wife currently takes an SNRI, synthroid, hydros for pain, and propranalol for migraines.  I can buy whatever else, although my wife probably only has 30-40% of her liver.

Hi @zed85, really sorry about this extremely difficult situation. Your wife must be feeling too weak to undergo more chemo. Phenylbutyrate may enhance 5FU. ( https://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/77/13_Supplement/1188)

Here are some other suggestions.

Hepaprotective
--------------

→ Milk Thistle + Black cumin seed oil + Resolvins, combination may offer both hepaprotective and anticancer effects

→ calcium d glucarate C https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12197785/

→ help heal the liver - liver powder or liver pills from healthy range-fed animals.

→ fresh vegetable juice (beet/carrot).

→ Bacopa monnieri
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/51687238_Potential_Effect_of_Bacopa_monnieri_on_Nitrobenzene_Induced_Liver_Damage_in_Rats

 

Foods that kill cancer stem cells: Resveratrol(Grapes, plums, Berries), Delphinidin(Berries), 6-Gingerol(Ginger), Epigallocatechin-3-gallate(Green Tea), Curcumin(Turmeric), Linalool (Basil, Grapes), Lycopene(Tomato), β-Carotene(Carrot), Baicalein(Chinese Skullcap), Isothiocyanates(Cruciferous vegetables), Parthenolide(Feverfew), Perylill alcohol( Mint, Cherry, Lavender), Ursolic acid(Cranberry, Thyme, Basil, Oregano), Withaferin A (Ashwagandha), Silibinin(Milk Thistle), Quercetin(Capers, RED onion), Vitamin D3(Fish, Egg yolk, cod liver oil), Piperine(Black pepper), Guggulsterone (Myrrh Gum), Flavanoids

Glycolysis inhibition: Turmeric, Graviola, Cardamom Spice, Ginger, Fisetin, Myricetin, Silibinin, Quercetin,
Apigenin, Citric acid, Cinnamic acid, Sulforaphane.

Inhibit glutamine uptake: green tea (egcg), ashwagandha, peppers.

Lower lactate levels: magnesium chloride (mix 20 grams in a bottle of clean water, drink 50ml twice a day), nettles(extract, tea), lemon juice (citric acid), Green tea (extract), Saffron, Gelum drops.

Increase NK cell activity: reduced lactate levels improve NK cell activity, enzymatically modified rice bran, blueberries, Brolico supplement, melatonin, Panax ginseng, cardamom & black pepper (work synergistically) Turkey Tail, Active Hexose Correlated Compound, zinc(1 hour before breakfast or before lunch), Modified citrus pectin, IP6, MYO X (inhibition of activin-A by follistatin.

Luteolin: Radicchio(highest), celery, parsley, broccoli, onion leaves, carrots, peppers, cabbages, apple skins. + IP6 & Inositol (+ 10mg Zn)

 

Vitamin D3 + Sulforaphane + Lycopene

 

Ascorbic acid + Riboflavin

 

Mistletoe + Chaga

 

Gut microbiota can influence HDAC activity via microbial-derived metabolites. Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.,
may increase butyrate concentrations.
+ Sodium Phenylbutyrate (4 gr or higher) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12579311/ https://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/77/13_Supplement/1188
+ Melatonin

 

AHCC + Fucoidan (+ 500mg ascorbic acid)

 

Kind Regards


ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572

ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

METFORMIN + VITAMIN D


ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

curcumin + celecoxib


ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

L-Carnitine supplementation reduces the general fatigue of cancer patients during chemotherapy

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5795559/

 

Curcumin + carnitine: Carnitines slow down tumor development of colon cancer

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23386399/

 

 

 


ReplyQuote
ZED85
(@zed85)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

Thank you for the replies. Much appreciated.


ReplyQuote
Kimster
(@kimster)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 115
 

Hi, just would like to share the following for reference:

 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32933338/

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01635581.2020.1820055?journalCode=hnuc20

Inositol Hexakisphosphate and Inositol Enhance the Inhibition of Colorectal Cancer Growth and Liver Metastasis by Capecitabine in a Mouse Model

Published online: 16 Sep 2020

 

Abstract

To investigate the effects of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) and inositol (INS) with capecitabine<span;> treatment on colorectal cancer (CRC) growth and liver metastasis in mice, we established an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

The study designated five experimental groups: a control group, a model group, a capecitabine (60 mg/kg) treatment group, an IP6 + INS (80 mg/kg: 80 mg/kg) treatment group, and a capecitabine + IP6 + INS (60 mg/kg: 80 mg/kg: 80 mg/kg) treatment group.

Compared with the model group, the tumor parameters of the other three treatment groups were significantly reduced.

The combination of IP6 and INS with capecitabine is more effective in improving survival rate, reducing tumor weight, and inhibiting liver metastasis.

Compared with the model group, the expression of E-cadherin in each treatment group was elevated, while the expression of N-cadherin and vimentin was suppressed.

This phenomenon was more obvious in the combination group.

The combination more significantly reduced the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 in the serum of CRC mice compared with other intervention groups.

Our data indicate that IP6 and INS enhanced the effect of capecitabine on CRC growth in mice by modulating the expression of inflammatory factors, intercellular adhesion molecules, and vimentin.

 

-----‐------------------------------------------------

Some previous discussions about IP6 in this specific forum:

https://www.cancertreatmentsresearch.com/community/natural-substances/phytic-acid-phytates-ip6-anti-cancer/

 

 

Thanks.

Kimster


ZED85 and Daniel liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 
Posted by: @j

@zed85

DHA + Butyrate

https://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/67/11/5561

Aspirin + Curcumin + Sulforaphane

Astragalus + Salvia Miltiorrhiza

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258700464_Compound_Astragalus_and_Salvia_Miltiorrhiza_Extract_Suppresses_Hepatocellular_Carcinoma_Progression_by_Inhibiting_Fibrosis_and_PAI-1_mRNA_Transcription

@zed85

Aspirin + Curcumin + Sulforaphane " From our studies, we report a 2–5-fold reduction in doses with ASP (1 mM) and CUR (10 μM). Similarly, 20–40 μM of SFN is reported to be active against various cancers, whereas our dose of 5 μM concentration in combination with ASP and CUR reduced the concentration by 4–8 times (18,21,22). Subsequent studies using apoptosis and colony formation assays confirmed these observations and further strengthen the hypothesis of synergistic effect using combinatorial regimens" {study}

Sodium Phenylbutyrate https://www.canchema.com/product/sodium-phenylbutyrate-4-pba/  

66mg Sulforaphane Glucosinolate https://www.mcsformulas.com/en/vitamins-supplements/broccoli-sulforaphane-ultra66/

 


ZED85 and Daniel liked
ReplyQuote
ZED85
(@zed85)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

@j 

 I ordered the Sulforaphane Glucosinolate from MCS a few days ago and it should arrive soon 🙂  She is already taking Curcumin and Aspirin so this seemed like one of the easiest combinations to start immediately (Vitamin D3 + Sulforaphane + Lycopene is next).  I had also ordered a liver powder at your suggestion.  It arrived today and seemed to help her energy levels almost immediately.  Thank you.

She will have bloodwork done again next Wednesday.  We'll see if any of her markers improve with the current regimen of FenBen, D+E, Curcumin, Propanalol, Aspirin, Quercetin, and high dose Melatonin.  Her CEA has been steadily rising for months.

 


ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 
Posted by: @zed85

@j 

She is already taking Curcumin and Aspirin so this seemed like one of the easiest combinations to start immediately (Vitamin D3 + Sulforaphane + Lycopene is next).  I had also ordered a liver powder at your suggestion.  It arrived today and seemed to help her energy levels almost immediately.  Thank you.

@zed85

Sounds good!

Here's a bit more info on Phenylbutyrate, I think it's an important compound in cancer treatment.

When phenylbutyrate is metabolized in the body it produces byproducts, phenylacetylglutamine
and phenylacetate, which is actually antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1:

Long-term survival following treatment with antineoplastons for colon cancer
with unresectable multiple liver metastases: report of a case
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12768372/

Randomized Phase II Study of 5-Fluorouracil Hepatic Arterial Infusion with or
without Antineoplastons as an Adjuvant Therapy after Hepatectomy for Liver
Metastases from Colorectal Cancer
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4366171/

CSS rate was significantly higher in the AN arm versus the control arm (n=33) with a
median survival time 67 months (95%CI 43-not calculated) versus 39 months (95%CI 28-47)
(p=0.037) and 5 year CSS rate 60% versus 32% respectively.
(CSS is the length of time from either the date of diagnosis or the start of treatment
for a disease, such as cancer, to the date of death from the disease)

My father in law used antineoplastons A10 in addition to his treatment for a Glioblastoma
Multiforme, and is still alive today almost 20 years after DX.(life expectancy for
Glioblastoma is less than 2 years.)

Phenylbutyrate is also a Glutamine inhibitor.

Red Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) helps to regain strength and has anticancer activity.

Red Ginseng Extract Reduced Metastasis of Colon Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3659544/

Pharmacological Effects of Ginseng on Liver Functions and Diseases: A Minireview
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3446728/

I'd also include plenty of grapes in the diet, along with a grapeseed extract
since most grapes are seedless.

Just to clarify, in the above posts when I used the + sign this means there's likely
to be synergetic anticancer activity when using those compounds together.

For example Luteolin + Inositol + IP6 (studies show synergy Luteolin Inositol and Inositol with IP6)

Also, when using many supplements consider intermittent dosing (X days ON/ Y days OFF) and rotate/alternate supplements.

 


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

@zed85

in addition to the above, a few other suggestions:

Hippocrates Soup
Recipe https://www.downtoearth.org/recipes/soups/hippocrates-soup
You can remove most of the fiber with a stainless steel rotary food mill,
this way you retain plenty of nutrients and are easily absorbed. Tastes great too IMO.

Regarding Vitamin D3:
+ Mg: Bioavailability of Vitamin D depends on magnesium. (note that most chemo depletes magnesium, and many people are already low on Mg, to begin with).
http://cardiacos.net/wp-content/uploads/ArticulosMedicos/20180722/2018---Role-of-Magnesium-in-Vitamin-D-Activation-and-Function.pdf
+ Vitamin K2: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19424596

Nattokinase Crude Extract Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth
https://www.jmb.or.kr/journal/view.html?volume=29&number=8&spage=1281

About grapes (dark-purple/blue variety) as anticancer: Medical research University of Louisville
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHqlXdp5JYs
Grapes have a low glycemic index https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/139/9/1794S/4670548

Theobromine
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S175646462030517X


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
ZED85
(@zed85)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

@j Thanks, I was surprised that my wife's D levels weren't higher the last time she had her levels checked (she takes 5000IUs), so I'll address the Magnesium.

Regarding Phenylbutyrate, from what studies I've found, it looks as if the appropriate oral dose is around 27g/day?  Is that also what you've seen?


ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 
Posted by: @zed85

@j Thanks, I was surprised that my wife's D levels weren't higher the last time she had her levels checked (she takes 5000IUs), so I'll address the Magnesium.

Regarding Phenylbutyrate, from what studies I've found, it looks as if the appropriate oral dose is around 27g/day?  Is that also what you've seen?

@zed85

18 grams a day is the dose I recall as most common, gradually reducing to 12, 9, and 4.5 grams.
A member here has been using 4 grams for his mother with glioblastoma, in the case of my father
in law we used A10 and probably equivalent to about 3,5 grams of phenylbutyrate. When you're using cocktails of drugs and supplements I think it's safer to use a low dose and gradually increase to the higher end of the range (if needed).

Here´s a Vitamin D calculator:

https://www.grassrootshealth.net/project/dcalculator/

If she's supplementing 5000IU a day and it's not going up I'd supplement magnesium, it's a great mineral for healing in general. Taking Vitamin A above the Recommended Daily Allowance
has been found to reduce the effects of vitamin D. Some riboflavin could be useful, just a little,
either from a supplement or via her diet.


ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 
Posted by: @j
Posted by: @zed85

Regarding Phenylbutyrate, from what studies I've found, it looks as if the appropriate oral dose is around 27g/day?  Is that also what you've seen?

@zed85

18 grams a day is the dose I recall as most common, gradually reducing to 12, 9, and 4.5 grams.
A member here has been using 4 grams for his mother with glioblastoma, in the case of my father
in law we used A10 and probably equivalent to about 3,5 grams of phenylbutyrate. When you're using cocktails of drugs and supplements I think it's safer to use a low dose and gradually increase to the higher end of the range (if needed).

@zed85

Here's a case report on the use of PB:

Complete response of a recurrent, multicentric malignant glioma in a patient treated with phenylbutyrate

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12241121/

"The patient was started on sodium phenylbutyrate, 18 g daily in three divided oral doses, and reduced to 9 g/day and eventually to 4.5 g/day to eliminate mild, reversible side effects. Four years later, the patient has a KPS functional score of 100%. Phenylbutyrate is a well-tolerated, oral agent that shows potential for the treatment of malignant gliomas."

 

 


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
SIR2
 SIR2
(@sir2)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 2
 

@j Metformin + VD is worth trying, from the studies. However, the patient needs a doctor willing to prescribe MET. It's not usually prescribed to non-diabetics, even by oncologists fully aware of the research. They don't want to prescribe something that they feel is not the norm for treatments.

Finding a doctor to prescribe Everolimus (+ self prescribed VD) is another potential treatment option, but not the norm for CRC.  EVE is said to be expensive as well. Two oncologists told me "no" to both MET and EVE.(I was asking for an MTOR inhibitor)

Thanks for reminding me about magnesium. Vitamin K important, too, especially long-term.

And, make sure your multi-vitamin has vitamin A in form of beta carotene. That will prevent your body from over producing Vit  A.

Vit D is generally syngeristic with MTOR inhibitors, from what I've read.


johan liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

@sir2

If I'd wanted to use a drug like metformin and couldn't get a prescription from an MD I'd buy it online. 

 


ReplyQuote
SIR2
 SIR2
(@sir2)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 2
 

Are you in the US? I don't know of a way to buy online without prescription. Anyway, I doubt my father would to take a drug which was not prescribed by a doctor. I think he is strict or stubborn in certain ways, which I am not.

 


ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

@sir2 

www.buy-pharma.md ships to:

Australia
China
Denmark
Finland
Greece
Ireland
Japan
S. Korea
The Netherlands
New Zealand
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Saudia Arabia
Switzerland
Taiwan
Thailand
UK
USA


ReplyQuote
ZED85
(@zed85)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

@sir2 

AgelessRx is a work around.  It's prescribed off label as an anti aging drug.

CareOncology will also prescribe it.  This is the route Ive taken as they also prescribe mebendazole and statins


johan liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

@zed85

Drug Trial to Investigate the Safety and Efficacy of Niclosamide Tablets in Patients With Metastases of a Colorectal Cancer Progressing After Therapy (Nikolo)

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02519582?term=NIKOLO&rank=1

Dr. med. Susen Burock

https://cccc.charite.de/en/metas/person_detail/person/address_detail/burock/


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
ZED85
(@zed85)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

@j 

Thanks for the contact.

We're in a bit of a transition period.  My wife hasn't had chemotherapy now in over a month.  We ran 222mg Fenbendazole/day for a week, followed by 2 weeks of 111mg/day.  She's off this week to give her liver a break.  We've been doing Curcumin, D/magnesium, E, Aspirin,  Sulforaphane, Propranolol, Quercetin, and Berberine (and some of the hepa protective items you mentioned).  I have Sodium Phenylbutrate on order as well.

We talk to CareOncology on the 9th, and hopefully from there move to a Statin/Doxy/Mebendazole/Metformin combo.  I'll be likely swapping out supplements then (Quercetin conflicts with Metformin from what I've read), keeping Berberine, Aspirin, and Propranolol.  That should have most metabolic pathways reasonably well covered, and we'll take at alternating some of the things in this topic.

I will hopefully be able to give good news in a few weeks.  She gets bloodwork done again on the 11th, and we can see what her CEA and such looks like.  Last update it was way up to 2600.  I think the fenbendazole was giving her a lot of night sweats.  Not the worst side effect to have, but not sure what to make of it either.


johan liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

@j  Best of luck!


ReplyQuote
Daniel
(@daniel)
Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1034
 

Dear @zed85

Have you seen this first case report? https://www.cancertreatmentsresearch.com/10-cases-of-complete-remission-from-stage-4-cancers-after-using-supplements-or-repurposed-drugs/

Ivermectin is indeed very relevant in CRC case.

Between Fenbendazole and Mbendazole, I would probably choose for Mebendazole in CRC based on previous case report. 

If you use any of these, I would stop them a few days before chemo and I would restart them day day with chemo.

Kind regards,
Daniel


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

@zed85

The Synergistic Antitumor Effect of 5-Fluorouracil Combined with Allicin against Lung and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells:

https://en.x-mol.com/paper/article/1253455222690177024

Stabilized allicin:

https://www.allicin.co.uk/product.php/13/23/allimed_reg__100_capsule_pack


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 
Posted by: @j

@zed85

The Synergistic Antitumor Effect of 5-Fluorouracil Combined with Allicin against Lung and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells:

https://en.x-mol.com/paper/article/1253455222690177024

Stabilized allicin:

https://www.allicin.co.uk/product.php/13/23/allimed_reg__100_capsule_pack

 

Allicin and Digestive System Cancers: From Chemical Structure to Its Therapeutic Opportunities

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fonc.2021.650256/full

  • Allicin + Artemisinin (artesunate)

http://journal.waocp.org/article_28000_c371b0ae074e35b423ecf5000a081c52.pdf

 

 


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

Butyrate, A Major Bacterial-derived Metabolite: Understanding of Butyrate Metabolism in Cancerous Colonocytes

https://trace.tennessee.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5758&context=utk_graddiss


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 
Posted by: @j

Butyrate, A Major Bacterial-derived Metabolite: Understanding of Butyrate Metabolism in Cancerous Colonocytes

https://trace.tennessee.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5758&context=utk_graddiss

@zed85

A butyrate prodrug: 

https://www.laboratoire-optim.com/en/butycaps/

Butyrate and phenylacetate as differentiating agents: practical problems and opportunities

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8538206/

  • note the synergy with vitamin A

 


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

In the previous post, I linked the wrong URL for "Butyrate and phenylacetate as differentiating agents: practical problems and opportunities"

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8538206/


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
johan
(@j)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 572
 

More on butyrate:

Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) and Butyrate Synergistically Induce Colonocyte Apoptosis by Enhancing Mitochondrial Ca2+ Accumulation

https://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/67/11/5561

 


ZED85 liked
ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 2
Share: