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Results From the Phase 3 PARADIGM Trial

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johan
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 4 years ago
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Isn't this new data also pointing to microbiome involvement? I think there's an important role for microbiome-based treatments such as cocktails of antibiotics/probiotics and nutrient interventions. 


   
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johan
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Mitochondrial dysfunction in the gastrointestinal mucosa of children with autism: A blinded case-control study

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/figure?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0186377.g002

Note the difference between right and left.

What's also interesting is that in autism there's a higher burden of mutations in cancer-promoting oncogenes, but they have lower rates of cancer. Notice the dysbiotic bacteria in the cecum of people with autism and likely too much production of butyrate.


   
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Daniel
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@j Very much agree, Johan. While we often discuss mechanisms at the level of the tumor cells, it is very much possible the origin of cancer is at microbiome level.

For that reason, I woudl like to give more attention to this subject in the coming months, and following this dive into the subject, also to design some powerful probiotic cocktail.

Kind regards,
Daniel


   
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johan
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@daniel you mentioned salinomycin as one of the best anticancer substances and other carboxylic ionophores such as monensin seem to be potent anticancer and of course antibacterial.

Makes you wonder if chemotherapy really works the way it is presented to work. Might just be killing bugs?

 


   
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johan
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the enormous disparity and inconsistency of results obtained with anticancer programs that focus on nutrition, herbs and supplements, may be easily explained by the equally enormous diversity and differences in the microbiome of humans. Comparing the microbiome of humans across locations and in time reveals a human might look the same on the outside, but on the inside, it's a totally different story.


   
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Daniel
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@j yes - very good question - I once started to write on antibiotics, but never finished that post, in which I wanted to address this aspect. It's important that we do this exercise of change in perspective and not get stuck to one perspective only.

It also fits to the observation of others and myself indicating that cancer seems to be an infectious disease. There are multiple examples of people that got cured of cancer after using antibiotics intensively.

What if they wiped out many good and bad bacteria, and lucky the good bacteria grew back as the dominant population? What if we woudl control that re population with probiotics and or fecal transplant?

There are already studies showing that obesity may be infectious through the influence of microbiome. 

Very interesting field I think.

Kind regards,
Daniel

 


   
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johan
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Posted by: @daniel

@j  It's important that we do this exercise of change in perspective and not get stuck to one perspective only.

Exactly, changing the perspective opens up a whole new line of treatment options.


   
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