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The oncoprotective fever hypothesis: Have antibiotics, antimalarials and antipyrectics contributed to the global rise in cancer over the past century?

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medline
(@aliml2)
Joined: 9 months ago
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Abstract

The adaptive and therapeutic nature of fever has been recognized for centuries and both local and systemic thermotherapy are now used to enhance the effectiveness of both chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. We propose that the success of antiseptic, antibiotic, antipyretic and antimalarial strategies and medications over the past century and a half may have had the unintended effect of releasing precancerous growths and neoplastic foci from the inhibitory effects of intermittent fever. This may be a previously unrecognized factor in the overall rise in cancer rates in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2021.110720

Decreasing human body temperature in the United States since the Industrial Revolution

In the US, the normal, oral temperature of adults is, on average, lower than the canonical 37°C established in the 19th century. We postulated that body temperature has decreased over time. Using measurements from three cohorts—the Union Army Veterans of the Civil War (N = 23,710; measurement years 1860–1940), the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I (N = 15,301; 1971–1975), and the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment (N = 150,280; 2007–2017)—we determined that mean body temperature in men and women, after adjusting for age, height, weight and, in some models date and time of day, has decreased monotonically by 0.03°C per birth decade. A similar decline within the Union Army cohort as between cohorts, makes measurement error an unlikely explanation. This substantive and continuing shift in body temperature—a marker for metabolic rate—provides a framework for understanding changes in human health and longevity over 157 years.

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.49555

Increasing consumption of vegetable oils per capita is another factor in reducing human body temperature, which may provide the conditions for tumor growth!

This is Your Body Temperature on Vegetable Oil

https://fireinabottle.net/this-is-your-body-temperature-on-vegetable-oil

 

 


   
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Manuone
(@manuone)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 157
 

Its very interesting!

 


   
medline, johan, medline and 1 people reacted
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johan
(@j)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 1196
 
Posted by: @aliml2

Abstract

The adaptive and therapeutic nature of fever has been recognized for centuries and both local and systemic thermotherapy are now used to enhance the effectiveness of both chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. We propose that the success of antiseptic, antibiotic, antipyretic and antimalarial strategies and medications over the past century and a half may have had the unintended effect of releasing precancerous growths and neoplastic foci from the inhibitory effects of intermittent fever. This may be a previously unrecognized factor in the overall rise in cancer rates in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2021.110720

Decreasing human body temperature in the United States since the Industrial Revolution

In the US, the normal, oral temperature of adults is, on average, lower than the canonical 37°C established in the 19th century. We postulated that body temperature has decreased over time. Using measurements from three cohorts—the Union Army Veterans of the Civil War (N = 23,710; measurement years 1860–1940), the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I (N = 15,301; 1971–1975), and the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment (N = 150,280; 2007–2017)—we determined that mean body temperature in men and women, after adjusting for age, height, weight and, in some models date and time of day, has decreased monotonically by 0.03°C per birth decade. A similar decline within the Union Army cohort as between cohorts, makes measurement error an unlikely explanation. This substantive and continuing shift in body temperature—a marker for metabolic rate—provides a framework for understanding changes in human health and longevity over 157 years.

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.49555

Increasing consumption of vegetable oils per capita is another factor in reducing human body temperature, which may provide the conditions for tumor growth!

This is Your Body Temperature on Vegetable Oil

https://fireinabottle.net/this-is-your-body-temperature-on-vegetable-oil

 

 

One of the reasons I like Rosemary (the herb), is it produces heat. I didn't know it had this property until I started using it and noticed this effect. 


   
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